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Articles / News

Hear the personal stories of some of today's most influential women, including Sarah Silverm...
Kathleen Harris
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Videos / Office Hours

Make Yourself Memorable: How To Become Someone They'll Never Forget

Julie Jansen has empowered...

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I would not wear shorts to the office, it seems inappropriate and too casual.
Victoria Hinojosa Follow Comment Author
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Alexis Madison FOLLOW MEMBER
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What advice do you have for a soon to be college graduate looking to further their professional development and work in digital media?
Hi Alexis! Digital media is an exciting place to be right now—and the landscape is constantly changing. As far as professional development, I think reading as much as you can is a great way to stay on top of trends (some of my favorites: The Next Web, Mashable, Nieman Journalism Lab, Recode). Keeping up on your reading also gives you great conversation pieces for when you start interviewing and meeting more people in the industry. Twitter is also huge for anyone looking to break into the industry and meet the right people. You can find out about job and internship opportunities, participate in conversations around digital media, connect with thought leaders in the field, and develop your own voice. It can even lead to coffee dates! I would also suggest narrowing in on what type of role you're most interested in (editorial, sales, marketing, etc.) and developing a list of target companies. Final piece of advice: an assistant role can be a great way to break in to a company. It allows you to focus on building relationships and showing that you can be a valuable member of the team, two keys for advancing your career.
Fran Hauser FOLLOW MENTOR
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Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu walks you through the art of storytelling. You'll learn how to craft...

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From social work to investment banking, 28 Millennials across all industries reveal what ...

Zahra Barnes
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Ariel Foxman is the editor of Time Inc.’s InStyle, the world’s foremost luxury fashion media...

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Jessica Munoz FOLLOW MEMBER
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I'm a mid-level manager in a new department. How can I avoid their gossip/taking sides without losing trust/relationships?
This is a delicate line to walk, Tiffany, but I think it's always best to remain above the fray. I encourage you to only engage in these conversations when you can play the role of the coach in supporting your colleagues in managing certain situations/people. One way is to spark them to question their assumptions. For example with questions like "Was this a one time thing or has this been your consistent experience with X?" Another is to offer another rational alternative to the narrative the person has created. For example saying something like "Well it sounds crazy but if I put myself in X shoes I could see how they might think that X." The tricky balance is in genuinely helping your colleagues without expressing anything negative about who they might be struggling with.

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These #LeanInTogether ideas will melt your heart.

Heather Finn
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Ella Tran FOLLOW MEMBER
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What are your advices to conduct an effective informational interview? What have young professionals asked or done that impress you?
I don't know about everyone, but in my last years at Cosmo, it got harder and harder for me to make time for informational interviews. So I would offer to respond to a few questions by email or do a short phone interview. If someone offers that instead of an in-person interview, please be understanding. Sometimes people wouldn't even thank me if all I did was answer questions online. (When I asked one college senior why she hadn't thanked me for taking part of my Saturday to answer her questions, she told me she didn't want to take up any more of my time). Whether you get phone time, online time or face time, really prepare your questions so that they're smart and not something you could have found through a Google search or checking the company's website. Sound passionate about the topic at hand. And though you're there to ask questions, be sure you showcase yourself indirectly. You could say something like, "While I was in college, I had the opportunity to create a social media strategy for the campus radio station that helped boost the audience by 12 percent. Where do you see your company going with social media in the next year?" And send a thank you note, please!!!!
Kate White FOLLOW MENTOR
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Connect / New Comment

Shorts are not professional enough for my office. Dresses of the same length are not as casual so they're fine, but shorts present a different image.
Be Hale Follow Comment Author
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Connect / New Comment

I work in a conservative environment, so the idea of wearing shorts or even a short skirt is out the window. I think shorts that are a bit longer in length, like Bermuda shorts, with a professional top might be appropriate in some creative workspaces. But in general, I feel that shorts are not professional for most offices. I agree with Be Hale that, unfortunately, they present a different image.
Lindita Bajrami Follow Comment Author
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Elana Gross FOLLOW MEMBER
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You are a speaker - do you ever get nervous? What is your best public speaking tip?
Nervous? Me? Naahhh. (Just kidding!) I was backstage at TED2013 this year about to go on in Session #1. Bono was sitting there in the green room, people were scurrying around trying to complete outfits, someone's outfit got messed up and they were trying to find a new belt. One speaker just kept rehearsing his hand gestures for some reason... and just about everyone looked like they could have used one of those airbags from an airplane. Being nervous is normal and REAL. I view it as a sign that we speakers care about showing up all fully alive and using the time we have to connect an idea well with an audience. Not easy to do, even for highly accomplished people. The best tricks to managing my nervousness is this. - First, really know your material. I probably spent some 50 hours preparing for the TEDtalk and it was (only) 3 minutes long. But I never questioned that I knew what I came to share. I never followed a script when I was onstage but all that practice before hand lends confidence in the moment. - 2nd, ground yourself. It's nerve racking to look out a sea of faces -- all those eyes staring at you. But if you slow down and connect eye-to-eye with 1 or 3 specific people, it reminds you these are just people. Next, remember to smile. Smiling opens up your heart. It's reminds you to have fun. SO many speakers are so focused on impressing you and really what creates resonance is heart. And, remember to breathe. The one thing I notice is that some speakers start speaking before the audience is ready. They start speaking from offstage so nervous to use their time, and get every word in. But it's better if you take a second, look at a few people, smile, take a deep breathe and ... then start ... you'll be grounded and the idea will therefore be heard. And I wrote a few other tips right before giving the TED talk, in a post entitled "secrets from a TED2013 Speaker -- preparing to give the talk of one's life" so I'll point you to those for more tips. http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130222153141-1131485-secrets-from-a-ted2013-speaker-preparing-for-the-talk-of-one-s-life Good luck on all your speaking endeavors!

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Paulette Brown is a Partner and Chief Diversity Officer of Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP and is a...

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Levo gives you the ultimate book gift guide, because everyone loves a good read over the hol...
Kelsey Manning
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Vatsal Patel FOLLOW MEMBER
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If I have an idea to start up a small company, should I stay in school or I should go for it?
Hi Vatsal, You don't have to choose. Many entrepreneurs start companies while still in school. If your business takes off, you can then consider whether you wish to finish school. I don't recommend quitting school simply based on an idea. Get some traction going and then consider your options. Best of luck! - Shama
Shama Hyder FOLLOW MENTOR
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Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy? Knowing your passions and what energizes you, and using that knowle...

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Ella Toselli FOLLOW MEMBER
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What's the most important skill set to have for someone considering going into law?
A combination of the following: familiarity with the basic concepts in accounting and finance, general attention to detail, a willingness to work hard, and a client service orientation.

Videos / Office Hours

Deborah Berebichez is the first Mexican woman to obtain a physics Ph.D. from Stanford University....

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Kathy Calvin is President and Chief Executive Officer of the United Nations Foundation. Her...

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Wearing shorts is pretty common among my colleagues, but it's been a non-starter for me. Don't get me wrong - I'm lucky enough that my work uniform is a t-shirt and a nice pair of jeans - but I like the flexibility of being able to have a blazer in the office to throw over my t-shirt if need be and not feel completely unprofessional. My verdict: shorts and blazers don't work unless you're a guitarist for AC/DC.
Nick Lioudis Follow Comment Author
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Videos / Office Hours

Sally Hogshead is a nationally recognized speaker and consultant who teaches people how to...

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Entrepreneur and networking pro Kevin Conroy Smith walks you through the power of people and how to make meaningful connections with peop...

Connect / New Comment

Not at my job—we dress business casual every day. Maybe at my previous job at an ad agency, but even then... most womens shorts are quit short—they'd be shorter than the sheath dresses I wear. That being said, if you can pair it with a great, professional looking blouse and fun jewelry, you just might be able to get away with it.
Sarah Eggers Follow Comment Author
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