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Videos / Office Hours

Claudia Chan is a women's leadership and lifestyle expert who celebrates today's female role...

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I would like to introduce you what i find last months I searched internet to find the best solution with finding vacancies, but was hard. By accident i find recruitment company called Bandalight. I wonder what they can do for me. After few e-mails I decide to try premium services! After 2 weeks i got first call from companies. Bandalight company helps housands of candidates find careers in many countries like Qatar, UK, USA, Germany, Hong Kong or Canada. They help me! If you are looking for job you should check that website: www.bandalight.com for more information about their company and services.
John Marrissey Follow Comment Author
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Amy Oraftik FOLLOW MEMBER
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For work I travel for stretches of up to 3 months. What are some suggestions you have for keeping a relationship alive with a bf back home?
Thanks for your question! Couples facing stretches of time apart is increasingly common with society being more transient. For couples who are use to spending regular in-person time together it will take some adjusting, but definitely possible to keep your bond. Consistency is the key to connection. As much as possible have regular conversations where you are sharing the small details of your day. Technology is also your best friend from adding a standing Skype date to your calendar to easily archiving sites you want to show your partner when he visits. I also love the app Couple to easily archive all of your communication and to also thumb kiss on your phone screen. You can also still have date nights where you watch the same shows or rent the same movie and share the experience together. Most importantly, your perspective will determine how this impacts your relationship. Treat it as an adventure for the both of you and also a career-boost, that will put assist you with better positions in the future, that will be a great asset to your family in the future. Wish you all the best! xo

Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu walks you through the art of storytelling. You'll learn how to craft...

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As eBay Inc.'s Senior Vice President, HR, Beth is responsible for all aspects of the company's...

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Incredible. I can't even imagine the determination it took to put so much of your money towards debt. I'm so happy that you are debt free. I can't wait for the follow up post about what life is like now, and how this process changed your relationship with money.
Avery Ford Follow Comment Author
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Articles / News

Hear the personal stories of some of today's most influential women, including Sarah Silverm...
Kathleen Harris
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Erin-Kaye Flor FOLLOW MEMBER
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What unique obstacles do women face in the workplace & what can young people do to combat or better facilitate these issues for the future?
My experience was often low expectations. "You won't want to travel because you're a mom" (put me on a plane I have four kids, haha!). It's expressed as if it's kindness, but of course it has a direct impact on one's career (I'm a journalist, so traveling is crucial). I think women always have to work a bit harder, seem tougher, laugh off inappropriate jokes. I found combatting these issues involved focus, and showing and telling people what I could do. I volunteered for assignments (even when I was picked third!) And then killed it when I had the opportunity. If people were turning out a piece or two a day during hurricane katrina, I did four! I also became very personally involved in my own quality control, and thus my success. Nothing went on without me double checking it or tweaking it the way I wanted it to be. Now, trust me, over-serving and eyeballing everything has it's own problems that come a bit later in one's career. But I found that smiling and shrugging off asinine comments like "you'll never come back to work once you have twins" was a good strategy. Working hard and doing good work seemed to make up for a lot of idiocy.

Resources / Guides

Entrepreneur and networking pro Kevin Conroy Smith walks you through the power of people and how to make meaningful connections with peop...

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Get your calendar out—we’ve got your ultimate July to-do list right here.

Heather Finn
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Elana Gross FOLLOW MEMBER
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What advice do you have for focusing on your own professional development and success without comparing yourself to others?
That's a tough one. I'm a pretty competitive person and at certain points along my career path, I have been in industries where it felt like my success was always measured against others in my field or at my level of expertise. And even back in high school and college, class rankings, acceptances to school and jobs seemed to be setting us up against others. For me, keeping in mind what my own personal vision and mission is has been key for me in assessing my progress and success. What is your big bold vision for yourself? How do you define success, personally and professionally? What motivates and inspires you? For each of us, that's a very different calculus. Only you can figure out yours. My big bold long-term vision for myself, to be written on my tombstone, is that I made a difference in the world and in people's lives. Over the years, I've regularly revisited what that meant: when I was full-time lawyering, I realized I was spending more time doing pro bono work for women and children, at the investment bank, it was honing my team building and management skills and developing a deep understanding of the financial world, when I was in public service, it was leadership,giving back, community building and organization and most recently, with Startup America, it's been further strengthening leadership skills, and developing national strategic partnerships and networks all focused on helping entrepreneurs access the resources and communities they need to be successful. Along the way, and I know going forward, I continually look to others who I admire, both personally and professionally and who have expertise and achievements that inspire and motivate me. But it's less about comparing myself than it is about learning from and being inspired by these men and women who have accomplished so much. And I check in regularly with dear friends, mentors and sponsors, who know me well, who both support me on my path and challenge me to embrace MY definition of success, not that of others. One of my favorite things to remember is to when we compare ourselves to others by looking at their outward life, we're comparing their edited masterpiece to our b roll. We don't know their struggles, their challenges - and really why should we? The only person any of us can work on is ourselves. Hope this helps. Kathleen

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Caroline Vexler FOLLOW MEMBER
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How did you end up at Levo League? (sorry for so many questions!)
I was introduced to Levo League while I was a senior in college. I absolutely fell in love with the company and the mission and everyone who worked there. We stayed in touch throughout the semester and into the summer (after I graduated). I was job-hunting and had Amanda and Leslie help me with my resume... and the rest is history!

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Hi Joyce! Do you have any suggestions on what daily actions we can take at work to combat the sedentary "cubicle life" and sitting all day?
Elissa Butironi Follow Comment Author
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Videos / Office Hours

Ann Shoket has been editor-in-chief of Seventeen magazine since 2007. Under her helm, the iconic...

Articles / Career Advice

How one woman went from architect to ice cream CEO in one fell ‘scoop’.

Amy Elisa Jackson
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Resources / Guides

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy? Knowing your passions and what energizes you, and using that knowle...

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Gretchen Rubin is the author of several books, blockbuster New York Times bestsellers Happier at...

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From Broadway to breakdown to bodyheart: Amber Krzys is a coach, speaker, change-maker and dog...

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Sonja Bistranin FOLLOW MEMBER
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Hi Nicholas! I'm about to graduate in May. What's the best way to reach out to my contacts for guidance and opportunity?
Hi Sonja, Three pointers: 1) Be specific People can sense a blanket email outreach, so I would make sure to understand what type of help you hope to receive from each contact. Are you asking them to keep an eye out for opportunities in a specific industry? Do you need a letter of recommendation? Do you need general guidance on career path? I would even title the email something like "Your advice on X?" 2) Be appreciative (proactively) The greatest gift someone can give you is his or her time, so when you are asking for help, make sure to highlight that you understand they are busy, and that you appreciate any guidance that they can provide. Offer to talk by phone or meet in person if that is easier for them, and emphasize that you'll do it at a time of their convenience. 3) Be concise Limit your communication to around 4 sentences. Make sure that they can understand what you are asking for and what they need to do next in just a few seconds. Best of luck - don't forget to keep checking out all of the new job opportunities on Levo as well :)

Articles / Career Advice

Whether or not your office has a dress code, are you willing to submit to the summer heat...

Jenny Groza
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Love this! I also have a job but a blog on the side, and furthering my writing passion in the midst of my career is what I'm currently exploring! Thanks for your words and advice.
Lauren Ward Follow Comment Author
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Videos / Office Hours

Erica Diamondis the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of the Award-Winning Women’s Lifestyle blog...

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Elana Gross FOLLOW MEMBER
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What advice do you have for focusing on your own professional development and success without comparing yourself to others?
Hi Elana - The answer is simple... Don't do it! I know it may be hard but you are best off carving out your own path, building self-awareness and clarity of purpose. Have faith in your own worth and abilities!

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I might wear nice shorts. People in my office have in the past, so at least I wouldn't be the first. I prefer wearing skirts and dresses though - more comfortable to me, and more professional anyway.
Leigh Anne Zinsmeister Follow Comment Author
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I don't see too many articles out there like this and came across this one and thought it might be helpful. I recently became a 20 something manager 8 months ago and found the insights and perspective helpful. I think being both a first time manager & having the stigma that comes with being a young, 20 something woman can be challenging. My advice is, leadership is a choice, not a rank. Don't let anyone make you feel otherwise. Take control of your team and lead them, because if someone saw the potential in you to become a manager in the first place, you have what it takes.
Rachel Howe Follow Comment Author
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