A bold, passionate career awaits you


Get instant access to a talented network and personalized tools that will help you get on the path you want - and make an impact.

Let's get started

HELP US PERSONALIZE LEVO FOR YOU

Do you know what your dream job is?

Or, skip this step →

YOU DO A LOT. WE KNOW.

Which best describes your current job status?

Or, skip this step →

GREAT, NOW LET'S TACKLE SOME BASICS

How long have you been in your career?

Or, skip this step →

LET'S TALK ABOUT HAPPINESS

How happy are you in your current role?

Or, skip this step →

FIND JOBS AND EVENTS NEAR YOU

Where do you want to work?

Woops. You left this field empty.

Or, skip this step →

Your Levo is ready!

Join to see personalized guides, mentors, networks, jobs, and more.


or

Articles / Lifestyle

An easy, must-read to start your weekend off right.

Molly Russell
FOLLOW AUTHOR
plus

Videos / Office Hours

Director Emeritus at McKinsey & Company, Joanna Barsh is also the best-selling author of How...

Connect / New Comment

I feel your pain. BUT! Stick it out. I lived at home until I was 26. Yep that's right. I'm almost 27 but guess what? I just BOUGHT a condo and that's pretty impressive and exciting and totally worth the years I spent feeling exactly the way you feel!!! You can do it!!
Rebecca Hollerbach Follow Comment Author
plus

Connect / Q&A

As a rising college senior, I recently decided to postpone graduate school. How do you go about figuring what career path you want to take?
Your senior year is the perfect time to explore different interests! Volunteer on the side, meet with all of your professors, and take on an internship (or two). Setting up informational interviews with people in your alumni network is a great way to learn about new industries and new companies! Trying to come up with your "career path" when you're still in college can be daunting. Instead explore different options and go with the one that feels the most right to you. Career paths are full of twists and turns and ups (and downs), so don't panic too much about having to follow a "set way."

Resources / Guides

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy? Knowing your passions and what energizes you, and using that knowle...

Articles / Lifestyle

Early risers aren’t the only ones doing big things!

Alexandria Butler
FOLLOW AUTHOR
plus

Videos / Office Hours

Erica Dhawan is a globally recognized leadership expert, corporate consultant and keynote speaker...

Resources / Guides

Entrepreneur and networking pro Kevin Conroy Smith walks you through the power of people and how to make meaningful connections with peop...

Connect / Q&A

Tam Dao FOLLOW MEMBER
plus
What advice would you give to a young woman entering a male-dominated field (computer science, in my case)? Thank you!
Dear Tam, I am celebrating 32 years in a male-dominated field this year :-) That is tongue-in-cheek of course. I am still the only woman in the institute I run (1 out of 49 faculty). Personally, I have never really had any problems with it. There are definite challenges, but there are also advantages. I've always felt that they balance each other out. I've certainly felt at times more scrutinized than others. I've heard comments/jokes made that I could interpret as demeaning. I've been harassed. On the other hand, being one of the few women has also given me advantages. If I go to a conference, people will remember me (no chance of not being noticed - getting noticed is a struggle that some of my male colleagues had at the start of their career). The probability of receiving funding has at times been higher because I am a woman. I manage quite well, and am happy, mostly because I don't dwell on it. I don't take things so personally. I take the good with the bad. I hope this helps a little. Cheers, Margot

Connect / Q&A

Janel Abrahami FOLLOW MEMBER
plus
How did you promote GoaG when you first started and how did you garner contributors whose style resonated with the site's identity?
Hi Janel! I just answered a question about a really good decision I made along the way, which was starting our own photography business (see below). This was HUGE in terms of promoting our brand in NYC, especially because we built up some great SEO in the process. Besides photos, I think another important thing was building relationships with the PR companies and the people that worked for them. Once we had good relationships and built trust with the people running all of the events, we had access and networks to send writers out to things to cover and then promote to their social worlds. In terms of garnering contributors, I was very lucky in having some key editorial employees early on that helped me craft a really great identity and brand. I think the process became self selecting afterwards, like a lot of things in life. Writers who told me they felt they were a good fit for the site because they read us religiously and liked going out etc, usually WERE a good fit for the site.... Of course you have some hits and misses along the way, but the collective voice of GofG has grown to be as much of a brainchild of my mind, as it is that of our main editors along the way (shout outs to Emily Green, Chiara Atik, Chelsea Burcz, Yumi Matsuo, Sophie Pyle), and of the community of writers and contributors we have that has been and always will be fluid and changing. The site has been made better because I have stepped back and let new identities take the reigns, which wasn't easy at first.

Videos / Office Hours

Binta Niambi Brown is a partner in the Corporate Practice Group of the New York office of...

Connect / New Comment

Changing your money mindset is so important and I love these tips! I talk a lot about these topics and more in the finance section of my blog www.busywifebusylife.com.
Sherita Rankins Follow Comment Author
plus

Videos / Office Hours

Erica Diamondis the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of the Award-Winning Women’s Lifestyle blog...

Connect / Q&A

Jaclyn Doak FOLLOW MEMBER
plus
As a young female professional, how would you suggest being assertive in the financial industry without coming across as domineering?
Hi Jaclyn - Thanks for your question! This is a great question and I know that many young women, including myself, ask themselves how to be successful in an industry that is dominated by men without seeming (for lack of a better term) "bitchy." My advice? Perfect the art of being assertive without being aggressive. Learning how to be assertive is so important for women in any field, but I think it's especially important in the financial industry, where women are generally outnumbered by men. To be assertive, you are straight forward, you look people in the eye and put forth your views confidently and directly. That's much different than being aggressive - taking the "my way or the highway" approach. To me, aggressiveness equates with bullying, and that can only get you so far. I hope that this was helpful Jaclyn, and I wish you luck in navigating your career in the financial industry!

Connect / Q&A

Audrey Gaspard FOLLOW MEMBER
plus
In a few words: technical trainings, Oil&Gas industry, Africa; so I'm interested in O&G and entrepreneurship in Africa: incubator, cases..
In general what I would prefer to do is put you in touch with the right person who might be able to help you (mind e-mailing me directly at shala@wim.co). This one is out of the realm of my expertise but I think I can get you to the right person. Not the optimal answer I know but this is a specific skill set and I don't want to send you on a wild goose chase.

Connect / New Comment

This. Thank you for this, Alexis! I literally just moved from AZ to San Francisco last night to follow my career goals. And I am feeling incredibly overwhelmed. Your article reminded me to breathe and trust in my goals.
Alana Tivnan Follow Comment Author
plus

Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu walks you through the art of storytelling. You'll learn how to craft...

Articles / Career Advice

Her kick-ass idea is getting preteen girls interested in computer programming. Read on. <...

Claire Landsbaum
FOLLOW AUTHOR
plus

Connect / New Comment

Dear Author of this Article, Thank you! As a pre-med students, there is a lot of stress and pressure put on you from every angle. Sometimes it's in the form of those doubting teachers, professors, or even advisors; sometimes, it's ourselves. No matter what field your in, I agree that it's important to find a your power motto and hold on it for dear life. Thank you for the motivation to keep on keeping on.
Stephanie Harris Follow Comment Author
plus

Articles / Fashion

“If I’m going to be a bag lady I’d much rather be a stylish, monogrammed bag lady.&...

Amy Elisa Jackson
FOLLOW AUTHOR
plus

Connect / Q&A

Caroline Ghosn FOLLOW MEMBER
plus
How do you recommend that male leaders and male peers engage in supporting women? Is it different for the two cohorts?
For the leader, you have to take away the funhouse mirror and you have to realize that talent is scarce, and you'd better take it wherever you can get it. I mean, let's just assume that I had some bias against males 5’10” or less, or something. I wouldn't hire or promote them. That's just plain foolish. When it comes to boards, I can tell you that the women we've put on our board know business, they know people, and they know how to make decisions. The women understand that shareholders are their partners. They've got all the qualities we want. I would say there was not a lot of malicious intent in overlooking; it just became very natural. It just wasn't in the consciousness of a lot of leaders. I think it's coming along well on that. When you get to peers, you wish you only had to compete with half the people instead of 100% of the people. I'm not sure how I would do if I was a male and I had two people to compete with and I could get rid of one of them because she was a woman, or one of the guys because he was a redhead, or some crazy reason like that. You know it is fun—it's enormous fun for me when I find somebody that starts and really doesn't realize how good they can be. Kay was that way. Kay Graham put limitations on herself, but she was a superstar. When she wrote her autobiography it was going to win a Pulitzer Prize. She wrote it and, incidentally, the person that helped her was a woman. It is a marvelous book, but all the time she was biting that self-doubt. I think you should encourage anybody, male or female, to reach their potential. I wouldn't just limit it to females. When you help anybody to reach their full potential, you’ve given them a gift that’s very important.