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HELP US PERSONALIZE LEVO FOR YOU

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YOU DO A LOT. WE KNOW.

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GREAT, NOW LET'S TACKLE SOME BASICS

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LET'S TALK ABOUT HAPPINESS

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FIND JOBS AND EVENTS NEAR YOU

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Videos / Office Hours

Kathy Savitt is the founder and former Chief Executive Officer of Lockerz and current Chief...

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Wow. I’m not an expert in this field but I completely disagree. I would not apply to any and all jobs. Looking for a job is in itself a job where you need to be strategic and focused. Your time is too valuable to spam e-mail everyone and go on multiple interviews. Like in marketing, I would do my research and qualify prospects and narrow it down to 3-5 companies/organizations that I could add great value to (solutions oriented). Secondly I would identify for them weakness, problems or opportunities they may not be aware of along with solutions to these areas and demonstrate how I have the skills to solve it for them. If you can somehow quantify the value of these solutions and related it to cost, revenue, market share, profit, or some other meaningful metric, that would also help. Keep this in mind, most companies generally are trying to increase revenue, profit, or market share, so relating how your work impacts these areas will clarify your value to the overall operation. By taking this approach it will probably increase your chance of standing out from the crowd, be memorable, and bring real value to a company/organization. Also, even if they aren’t hiring now, if the value you bring is significant enough to justify your salary, it’s possible they’ll create a position for you. Remember, they didn’t even know they had this problem or opportunity to begin with and now they’re trying to solve it. Here are 2 good examples. One is the co-founder of Twitter Jack Dorsey. http://venturebeat.com/2012/09/12/jack-dorsey-hack-first-job/ http://www.businessinsider.com/nina-mufleh-airbnb-resume-2015-4 Note: A big factor in your success on landing a job is always related to supply & demand for your profession. If you’re in a profession where there is excess or growing supply and stagnant or declining demand you’ll face a greater uphill battle. This is just my opinion, hope it helps.
richard kinjo Follow Comment Author
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Rebecca Harris FOLLOW MEMBER
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Do you have any tips to keep youself from getting overwhelmed with work/studying during university? Sometimes I really struggle with this.
I personally thrive when I'm super busy. But I definitely go through times when I feel overwhelmed. If it's a small situation, taking a shower or taking a night off almost always does the trick for me. Getting a full night's rest and waking up two hours earlier to finish work is also helpful. I work better and the quality of my output is way better when I'm rested. If you're feeling like you're drowning (i.e. the situation is BIG), then I recommend taking a full weekend off! Screen-free time seriously makes a difference. To PREVENT feeling overwhelmed, find something that keeps you "centered." For me, it's reading. I read every morning and every night! Also, keep track of everything you have to do. Staying organized and keeping an eye on the "big picture" will help alleviate some of that extra stress you might feel. Some of my study tips: http://www.thecollegeprepster.com/2011/01/intense-study-tips.html

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Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu walks you through the art of storytelling. You'll learn how to craft...

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Ashley Mason FOLLOW MEMBER
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I started a free service where I handle the social media of companies! How can I ask the companies to get compensated for it after summer?
The most compelling thing for a business owner is to see their numbers improving as a result of a decision they’ve made. So show them that trying your service was a valuable decision. You can demonstrate this in two parts: First, by showing your success, and second, by proving that you achieved that success in a strategic way. 1) Show your success How are you measuring success? Here are a few numbers to show them: - Show them how many new social media followers they have gained through your engagement – those are potential – or actual - customers. Create a chart that shows their following on the first day of your engagement, and how it has grown month-over-month. - Add up the number of impressions across various social media platforms. Services like Sprout Social can automate this for you. - Create a document with highlighted quotes from the most engaged community members. Show your client how you have managed to stir up responses from their followers. An anecdote is a compelling complement to the data you’re presenting. Make sure you include the avatar, handle, name, and quote – including all of this information makes it feel tangible. 2) Prove that you were strategic I would also highlight your strategy. It’s great that you’ve achieved strong social media impact, but how did you go about it? If you want them to pay for your services, you have to demonstrate that you have a comparative advantage and expertise that is worth their money and not easy to replicate. A few questions to answer in this section: - What has been your objective? (i.e. is it to gain followers, to drive traffic to a specific part of the site, to deepen engagement with existing followers, to get customer feedback on a product?) - How are you determining which social media platforms to use, when to use them, and what type of content to post? - What are some of your most interesting findings? (e.g., what have been some of your most successful posts?) How did you use those findings to adapt your approach? As Levo’s CEO, Caroline Ghosn, is fond of saying, “Show, don’t tell.” Pull these numbers into a few compelling charts (or at least an organized table), display exciting engagement from their customers, and open up your thought process to prove that they would be silly to miss out on the opportunity to engage you further. Finally, I would conclude by enticing them with what could be next. What should their social media growth goals be for the next 6 months? You can help them get there. You already know the brand, you have proven results, and investing in you has a much better ROI than traditional marketing channels.

Resources / Guides

Entrepreneur and networking pro Kevin Conroy Smith walks you through the power of people and how to make meaningful connections with peop...

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I used to use paper - there is something so nice about crossing things out. But I ended up having SO MUCH on my to-do list, that paper wasn't working. I hated the messy lists, and it wasn't convenient to carry a notebook. I've been using Asana for about 6 months and I love it. The project, task and sub-task concept is awesome for feeling like you made headway on something. Three tips I've learned: 1) Set up everything in one workspace if you want to see it all on one calendar. 2) Add EVERYTHING. Definitely take the Getting Things Done approach and get it all in there. Be sure to assign tasks to yourself (if you want to use the team functions) and add deadlines. 3) Build a habit to check it every morning and just keep the tab open.
Katie Kelly Follow Comment Author
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Be proactive about setting up time to meet individually with people in your office - on your team, in other departments, at your peer level, and above. 15 minutes getting to know someone and hearing about what they do goes a long way!
Anna Moseley Follow Comment Author
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Articles / Lifestyle

“He takes you on a fancy date and pushes the check your way—as a ‘joke.'̶...

Natasha Burton
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Levo League FOLLOW MEMBER
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Graduation is around the corner. What advice would you give to new college grads starting their first jobs?
Don't choose your job based on money alone. Choose your job based on what network you are being hooked into. Networks fuel success as much as your individual talent. Apple was one of my early jobs and, to this day, that network has proven to be incredible.

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Mary Sun FOLLOW MEMBER
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What would you say to someone with interests in both research (academia/PhD) and applied research (management/MBA) and is trying to choose?
I would ask why the person was interested in a PhD, and in the MBA and figure out what the main driving forces are. Is it working in teams? Is it solving puzzles? Is it working independently on long term projects? Is it teaching or education in general? Is it the coolfactor of having a title (may sounds funny, but I see many students coming into Stanford who want a PhD because of this more than anything else). If you are really interested in teaching at college level, a PhD is a must. So in that case, the answer is simple. In all other cases, we'd need to talk to find out what really tickles you.

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As a new writer, I love the point about finding your favorite spot to write. Something about it being designated for writing just makes me get productive as soon as I am in that space. Though right now I am just using my bed, but I will definitely create a writing nook sooner than later!
Shewa Dedeke Follow Comment Author
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Videos / Office Hours

Sheryl Sandberg has been the Chief Operating Officer of Facebook, Inc. since March 24, 2008. Ms....

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Kelly Williams Brown is a writer, blogger, reporter and agency creative living in Portland,...

Articles / Career Advice

We’ve all been there. How do you put your foot forward early on?

Jenny Groza
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Thanks for this insight Kristi! I burned a bridge at one point in my career although it went against every professional bone in my body. It too was based on your exact bullets noted above. I survived and it was a huge professional learning lesson.
Stephanie Lema Follow Comment Author
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Resources / Guides

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy? Knowing your passions and what energizes you, and using that knowle...

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Karen Quintos is senior vice president and chief marketing officer (CMO) for Dell, where she...

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The Managing Director, and a founder of Women Innovate Mobile, a 3-month mentorship driven...

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Maria Tariq FOLLOW MEMBER
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Hi Praveen, I know you touched on this, but how would you build a network and find opportunities in this field when your area has few?
Hi Maria, great questions. While, opportunities may seem limited, in fact there are many networks that you can tap into and there are many options, some of which could be to serve on volunteer boards or sub-committees. This not only shows time committment and passion but a way to do more and be more intimately associated with a particular organization whose mission/work you are passionate about. Another way to expand your network can be to attend social events that organizations host around a particular issue that you are passionate about. Guests attending are likely to be also passionate around the cause which makes for a good ice-breaker conversations especially on the onset when you are trying to get connected with a new network. Mentoring is also a very worthy cause, and many organizations and/or networks look for talented women to match with mentees. The key is to be consistent and committed and folks will recognize your effort, time and passion. Good luck and stay inspired-:)

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Elana Gross FOLLOW MEMBER
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Is there a particular moment or set of events in your life that led you to be interested in moving the "marginalized to the mainstream?"
As a woman and person of color I have had my fair share of incidents where clearly my gender and/or race were challenging for individuals to deal with. At first I passed these off as personal issues but realized that there are structural challenges in our systems that cause the "less than equal" environment for women, people of color and many others. Recognizing these institutional barriers existed made me want to fight for the most vulnerable and marginalized communities. If change could be made for these communities, then all communities could thrive. More recently my desire to "mainstream the margins" is connected to the demographic shifts taking place across the U.S. The rise in women, people of color, LGBTQ individuals and the like requires a new way of thinking about "minorities" and the "marginalized." In order for our civil society to be successful, we need to embrace everyone as equal. Therefore moving the marginalized to the mainstream for the sake of identity recognition, civic participation, having a voice and leadership is an important step in honoring the values of democracy that are core to American values.