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YOU DO A LOT. WE KNOW.

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GREAT, NOW LET'S TACKLE SOME BASICS

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FIND JOBS AND EVENTS NEAR YOU

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Videos / Office Hours

Jehmu Greene is an evangelist for disenfranchised and vulnerable communities. As owner of JSG...

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Great list, excepting the #4 Practice, while true, one should, to use Malcolm Gladwell 10,000 hours quote (like much other his work) is to quote BS. Gladwell is pop psych at it's worse and to put a number on hours of practice is a disgrace to, well, practicing. Here's a good article about what real practice means. http://www.businessinsider.com/new-study-destroys-malcolm-gladwells-10000-rule-2014-7
Colin Nekritz Follow Comment Author
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Freya Ruijs FOLLOW MEMBER
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Hi tara, how do you make sure your clients are able to translate your analysis to their business? Do you train or guide them?
Good analysis isn't just providing data - it's storytelling. Whenever I share an insight, it is always framed in the appropriate context so that whoever the stakeholder is, the analysis is totally digestable and actionable. Hope this helps!

Resources / Guides

With Bill McGowan, speaking coach and author

Public speaking and communicating at work can be a challenge for everyone—whether you'...

Videos / Office Hours

Jennifer Romolini is the Editor in Chief and Vice President of Content at HelloGiggles, a site...

Articles / Lifestyle

Make that beginning-of-the-year buzz last forever.

Madison Feller
FOLLOW AUTHOR
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Videos / Office Hours

Pitch Yourself, Sell Yourself, Carry Yourself: How to Succeed at Your First Job or Internship

...

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These are very powerful pieces of advice. We need to stop comparing ourselves.
Tracy Schwartz Follow Comment Author
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Resources / Guides

With Gabrielle Bernstein, life coach and author

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy...

Resources / Guides

With Natalie MacNeil, Emmy Award-winning media entrepreneur and Founder of She Takes on the World

You perfectly polished your resume, nai...

Connect / Q&A

Caroline Fox FOLLOW MEMBER
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What is the best advice you could give a new lawyer who is struggling to find a job because of the economy?
Hi Caroline, Without sounding trite, you just have to not be put off by "No." You have to have about 4 different resumes tailored to specific jobs...Show your interests on your resumes....And, keep checking in....Do not wait for people to get back to you....just keep expressing your interest and you might just get the job because you are the one "in the room" when the need arises. Take a job that might not be your first choice b/c it is absolutely true it's easier to get a job when you are already employed. Here's a little Hollywood story about not letting No get to you...I promise you it's true. When I was a young agent, I was trying to get a couple of beginner writers' script read by an Executive Producer of a big tv show. I had send the script and was following up to talk to the guy. Back then, if you didn't get a call back it was considered very rude and people would often stop calling. Well, this guy did not call me back, and I was so mad about it, I put him on my call sheet so that my assistant made sure that we called this guy every day....And I mean every single day.... for 8 months we left word for this guy. It was a huge running joke with me and I found it hysterically funny after a while. One day he picked up my call. He read the script and my writers got the job. What I learned is that it wasn't personal; he didn't even know me....but by being persistent I caught his attention and finally got through to him and thereafter he would read whoever I sent him. Where are you and what do you want to do? I might have more specific advice.
Gail Fanaro FOLLOW MENTOR
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Lila Barton FOLLOW MEMBER
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What's the hardest part about being an entrepreneur, and what do you do on a daily basis to get your mind ready for the challenges?
The hardest part about being an entrepreneur is knowing that you're going to fall down over and over and over again while fighting an uphill battle. Every day, if not every hour, holds a new challenge that you can't always predict. It's like a never ending roller coaster. It can be easy to get sucked into these dark, downward-spiraling moments when you feel like nothing you do is making a difference. But then you'll get an email or read a blog post about a woman who negotiated her salary because of an article she read on Levo, or another from a woman who met a new friend in a city because of LocalLEVO, or a woman will let us know that she put her name in for a big step-up opportunity because she felt inspired by an Office Hours she watched. Those moments make the I-can't-do-anything-right/I'm-not-good-enough times seem small and conquerable. The best part about entrepreneurship is that it provides you a vehicle to change the world for the better. Being an entrepreneur is worth it because each and every day you can see the effect your company is having on the lives of its users. And that gets me out of bed each and every morning.

Videos / Office Hours

Christina oversees Quantcast’s global marketing strategy and operations, including demand...

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"Stop comparing yourself to what you see online" That is a powerful piece of advice. Nowadays we tend to compare ourselves to other all the time. That really hurts our creativity because we see so much online. Sometimes all it takes is a day off the internet to reconnect with our inner creativity.
Clara del Val Follow Comment Author
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I am considering returning to school for a PhD in business. What advice do you have for beginning the application process?
Congratulations on continuing your education! I would begin your search by looking at the schools that actually offer a PhD or Doctorate in Business. Do you want to do academic research/teach on faculty or be a practitioner? I would recommend a PhD if you interested in academic research and teaching. There are other doctorates that are for scholarly practitioners, meaning you will be working as a consultant or for an executive in an organization. In terms of schools, are you interested in getting your degree at a business school or graduate school in Management, Organizational Behavior or Organizational Psychology? I would suggest looking at school rankings in this area - Business week, USA Today, Princeton Review, Financial Times and The Economist have great lists. Also, look at thought leaders in your area of interest, where are they teaching? Where did they go to school? Who stands out about the rest? What environment is conducive to your learning style - virtual, hybrid, interdisciplinary, or in person classes. Do you want to learn alongside other mid-career or executives? Or would you rather study with people who have less than five years of work experience, if any? Are you interested in an accelerated format or will you go full-time? Do you want to study in the states or abroad? After answered all these questions, then choose at least three strong choices. Personally, get to know people in the department and in admissions at these schools. What do they require for admittance? What type of students are in their program(s)? Do they offer a cohort format or are you on your own in terms of courses? How many people actually finish? Also, will you be able to do research in your area of interest(s)? Best of luck, Cindy
Cindy Pace FOLLOW MENTOR
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I would love to hear more about the financials of freelancing. I'm starting to freelance in addition to my 9 to 5 and how to fill out my taxes is already making my head spin.
Cari Ellison Follow Comment Author
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Resources / Guides

With Joan Kuhl, author, and founder & president of Why Millennials Matter

Oftentimes young managers, while enthusiastic, ambitious, an...

Articles / Career Advice

It will make the whole transition a lot smoother.

Heather Finn
FOLLOW AUTHOR
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Resources / Guides

With Tiffany Dufu, motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer

Tiffany teaches you the difference between management and ...

Resources / Guides

With Natalie MacNeil, Emmy Award-winning media entrepreneur and Founder of She Takes on the World

You work a 9-to-5 day and then do a 5-to...

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Levo League FOLLOW MEMBER
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Constructive feedback can be tough to absorb. What is your best advice for hearing hard feedback and making changes? Any personal examples?
Hard feedback is tough to hear and hopefully it is delivered with kindness. Usually our first reaction to hard feedback is denial. "this isn't true...I don't do that...however, remember that perception is reality and modifying behavior and wearing a smile ...can sometimes be all that it takes. If the feedback is specific to work performance; ask for examples and suggestions on how to improve. Try very hard not to take it personally; but see it as an opportunity for growth!

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Allie Arends FOLLOW MEMBER
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I started a new job and have no management or guidance in my new role. Can I turn a "set up to fail" scenario into a meaningful career move?
Absolutely! This is the perfect opportunity to position yourself as a winner. I'd begin with a conversation with your manager that goes something like "I understand that my job is to achieve results and I'm committed to doing that for you and this team. I just need a bit of guidance and would love to know your answers to two questions - What is your vision for success? What do you most need from me to ensure we get there?" I can tell you as a manager that people rarely take this approach and it is so refreshing.

Videos / Office Hours

Don't Get Frozen Out! The Art of Cold Calling

Marcy Twete is the Founder and CEO of Career Girl...