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HELP US PERSONALIZE LEVO FOR YOU

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YOU DO A LOT. WE KNOW.

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GREAT, NOW LET'S TACKLE SOME BASICS

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LET'S TALK ABOUT HAPPINESS

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FIND JOBS AND EVENTS NEAR YOU

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Articles / News

First Taylor Swift and Justin Bieber, now Simon Cowell.

Erica Murphy
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I teach tennis as a second job on the weekends. It's easy gas money for my full-time job during the week. My second job teaching tennis isn't "work"...I enjoy is so much...it's a break from the full-time job and the extra money is great!
Leanne Yarn Follow Comment Author
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Connect / Q&A

Anonymous FOLLOW MEMBER
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Hello Kelly, Can you please give me specific action steps for determining a career path after college and how to make it happen?
My career has evolved as a result of curiosity, self-awareness and a broad network of relationships. With that in mind, here are my suggestions for 2 immediate action steps: 1. look around you, what roles or functions/tasks seem interesting to you? Write a list of those roles, why you're interested in it and what you think you would bring to such a role. This exercise is a good way to find alignment between your interests and skills. 2. in your circle of contacts (friends, family), who has a career you admire? Create a list - even of people whose job you know you don't want - and go talk to them! Be curious about why they find meaning in their work. Why do they like their job? How did their career unfold? Their personal career journeys are intended to inspire you to take the first steps on your own.
Kelly Hoey FOLLOW MENTOR
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Resources / Guides

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy? Knowing your passions and what energizes you, and using that knowle...

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I'll get some green tea with a little bit of peach syrup in it for a little sweet ans southern twist.
Karys Belger Follow Comment Author
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Articles / Lifestyle

…which are oddly impossible to find. Problem, solved!

Kelsey Manning
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Videos / Office Hours

Dina Kaplan is co-founder of Blip, http://blip.com, the place for the best original series of the...

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Growing up in a European household meant my staple will always be caffeine-free herbal fruit tea sweetened with just a tiny bit of honey!
Patina Grayson Follow Comment Author
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Resources / Guides

Public speaking and communicating at work can be a challenge for everyone—whether you're presenting to a large group, sharing an idea in a meeti...

Articles / Career Advice

As a right-hand to top athletes, Masters experiences a lot of wins—and sometimes losses i...

Christina M. Tapper
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Connect / Q&A

Hilary Kelly FOLLOW MEMBER
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I run a blog in my spare time with thoughtful, original content. Should I include the url on my resume or business cards, when I get them?
I think it depends on what kind of job you're applying for. If the types of jobs you're applying to don't have relevance for social media (or match the type of content you're writing about), then I wouldn't include it. A company who does their due diligence will definitely find the blog. It's great that your blog had original and thoughtful content; that will certainly help you when they see it!! If you're applying for a job that requires some sort of digital literacy, then your blog could help demonstrate your understanding of online content creation and management. (If you want to include writing samples, I'd recommend pulling a few of your favorite posts and then create a separate digital portfolio. That wouldn't come across as too much of a "blog" and seems more professional!)

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Briana Luca FOLLOW MEMBER
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I'm graduating college next May so I was wondering, for a Journalism major, when do you think is the right time to start applying for jobs?
From what I know, most magazines don't hire far in advance. Some Wall Street jobs get filled months ahead of time but it doesn't generally work that way in journalism. When there's an opening, the person in charge wants to fill it immediately. I would say that in the winter you should definitely contact HR departments and arrange to go in for a first interview on spring break or a weekend if possible (double check with major magazine companies to learn exactly what timetable they advise). That way HR gets to know you. Stay in touch and then when you are out of school and a job opens up, they may think of you. Here's a funny thing. Many, many people apply to magazines, but when a job opens up at a given time, HR may have only a dozen or so active resumes. (People have moved on or gotten a job or whatever). So it's good to stay in touch and remind people that you are still actively looking. You want to keep your resume in the mix. Otherwise it just falls out of the pile.
Kate White FOLLOW MENTOR
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Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu teaches you the difference between management and leadership. Y...

Videos / Office Hours

Rebecca Mieliwocki is the 2012 California and National Teacher of the Year. She was chosen from a...

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When you make a good living, doing great work that has meaning, you free up more time and space in your life to give back even more. Thanks for sharing this list. It's like a Win-Win-Win!!!
Lori Hil Follow Comment Author
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Articles / Giveaways

Need career help? We know five inspirational leaders who are here to help you navigate yo...

Emily Drewry
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Emily Raleigh FOLLOW MEMBER
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I saw you speak at Fordham and LOVED your book! I started a magazine called Smart Girl's Guide. What is your advice for building readership?
Thanks, Emily. That means so much to me. The most important strategy for building readership is to get to know your potential readers as much as possible and fulfill a need for them that they're not getting fulfilled elsewhere. I've seen so many new editors-in-chief come into magazines and say, "I think we should do x" without first doing research and understanding the market. You could use tools like survey monkey to help you and also simply gather groups of women around the kitchen table. Pick their brains. Dive deep. But it's not enough to just know them. What's missing? What are they yearning for? What can you help them with. What tone of voice do they want to be spoken to in? I grew Cosmo's circulation by 700,000 by figuring out some things that young women seemed to really like: really candid sex advice, an irreverent tone, articles that helped explain how the freaking male brain worked. So figure out what gap you're going to fill. Don't be too general. The Smart Girl's Guide seems to promise something fairly broad. How can you tighten the focus somewhat?Once you fill a real gap, readers will find their way to you. You can tease some of the content on social media to help pull in new readers. But if the content isn't right, all the teasing in the world won't help. By the way, a book I love is Making Things Stick by the Heaths. Some good ideas in there
Kate White FOLLOW MENTOR
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Videos / Office Hours

Edith Cooper is an executive vice president and the global head of Human Capital Management at...

Videos / Office Hours

For over a decade, Bozoma Saint John has blazed a trail in her marketing and advertising career,...

Videos / Office Hours

Gloria Feldt is the bestselling author of No Excuses: 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think About...

Connect / Q&A

Levo League FOLLOW MEMBER
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Constructive feedback can be tough to absorb. What is your best advice for hearing hard feedback and making changes? Any personal examples?
Feedback is a gift. That doesn't mean it always feels great. Feedback is tough, but it will ultimately help you grow. When you are getting feedback try not to react, instead absorb. Hear what the other person is saying and ask for examples. Don't try to make excuses. What has happened, happened. Instead see what you can take away from the feedback and grow. Then take a little break after the conversation and sit down with the feedback (make sure you've taken great notes) and think about what you can do differently so that you don't repeat the negative feedback. And don't forget the positive feedback, keep doing those things!

Resources / Guides

Entrepreneur and networking pro Kevin Conroy Smith walks you through the power of people and how to make meaningful connections with peop...

Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu walks you through the art of storytelling. You'll learn how to craft...

Connect / Q&A

Elana Gross FOLLOW MEMBER
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How have you used social media to accelerate your career?
Hi Elana - Social Media has become THE platform for enhancing and leveraging your brand. LinkedIN is by far the most utilized tool and go-to when thinking about promoting your brand professionally. But before you use a platform - whether for personal or professional uses, I encourage you to think about what is your story, aka "personal brand"? What is the story you want to tell, and by clever use of social media, want your networks to communicate? Once you are clear on that, then search sites that collate social site content, e.g. zerply, about.me, vizify, and test out how you want your brand to be communicated. Always have a GREAT bio and headshot available and accesible online. Good luck! Daisy