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Listen up parents: Here's how to talk to your new graduates.
Kelsey Manning
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Binta Niambi Brown is a partner in the Corporate Practice Group of the New York office of...

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Connect / Q&A

Levo League FOLLOW MEMBER
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There never seems to be enough time in the day! What productivity tip works for you?
First thing, stop thinking there is never enough time in the day because it means you can't enjoy life. Second, the way we think about it at Chegg is by asking ourselves the following question: among the long list of things I can be doing which one, if I do it well, has the greatest leverage for our business? Or, in the case of personal endeavors, which will have the most significant positive impact on my life, for my friends, family, etc... If you focus on the one thing with the greatest leverage, then the outcome will have the most impact and you will feel productive!

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Entrepreneur and networking pro Kevin Conroy Smith walks you through the power of people and how to make meaningful connections with peop...

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Joy Adan FOLLOW MEMBER
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I saw your tip on Money Mondays; how do you know the right amount to ask for or go about establishing the 'business case' for your pay rise?
Hi Joy, There are a few ways you can establish your case. The first way is to investigate how much others in your field, with similar years of experience, earn on average. Sites like glassdoor.com, getraised.com and payscale.com can give you ballpark figures. Another way to get informed is to ask your HR manager what the salary range is for someone in your position. This is not something to be shy about asking. For example, when I was a TV producer in New York I learned from my HR manager that the salary range for my position was between $45k and $85k. Well, after being there for three years I hadn't moved very far up the scale. I asked my boss for a raise almost every 6 to 12 months, always with improvements and success stories to share. But she wouldn't budge. So, I quit and negotiated a salary at a new company that was twice my current. (see my answer to Elizabeth's question). You may be surprised to learn where you fall on that range, but no matter what, that information is GOLD because it gives you an immediate sense of how much wiggle room you have to earn more in your existing position - and you should bring that up to your boss when you have a discussion about getting a raise. Say: I've learned that in my current position, I have the potential to earn as much as X. I'd really like to work towards a raise. What advice do you have for me? And when he or she tells you, promise to deliver and ask for a follow-up meeting within 6 to 12 months. Good luck!

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Tara is the co-founder of Hipp Inspired, a full service Event Design & Management Firm based in...

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Kathleen Kent FOLLOW MEMBER
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When is the right time to change employers or jobs and what tips do you have to quickly learn a new organization and job function?
Kathleen, The best time to change employers all depends on the situation. Here are some things to consider as reasons to leave: 1. The opportunities from growth and development are quite limited. 2. Your image and brand has been severely tarnished or is diminishing your chance to grow. 3. The work environment is toxic and non-inclusive. Your co-workers are "crabs"in a barrel. 4. Leadership is a joke and they breed an organizational ghetto with "haves"and "have nots" 5. A great company with awesome opportunities for growth and development, critical mass of women and diversity in leadership, healthy workplace with kind, creative, innovative colleagues. 6. You have offers on the table that leave your current position in the dust. 7. You have outgrown the workplace and get a wheezy feeling when you have to go to work. 8. You are not being challenged and can do your job in your sleep. When exiting a role/company, always leave a good note as much as possible. Draft and follow a transition plan, tie up loose ends, and give your contact information to colleagues you want to continue relationships. In a new job/company, your first 90 days are crucial. Learn the business (competitors, products, streams of revenue), key influencers, what's valued, find out who will help you get your job done, know what's your remit, meet with your boss often, strategize for early wins. For advice on transition, pick up these two books: First 100 Days
Cindy Pace FOLLOW MENTOR
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Connect / New Comment

Hey, I'm wearing those robes today too! :) Going with all black underneath. Great outfit, and congratulations to Caroline!
Carina Bauman Follow Comment Author
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Videos / Office Hours

An internationally recognized multi-platform journalist, Keli Goff’s work has appeared in the...

Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu walks you through the art of storytelling. You'll learn how to craft...

Articles / Career Advice

Everything you need to master your personal brand.
Amy Feezor
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Articles / Work-Life Balance

Here's what you need to know about going back to work after maternity leave.
Kathleen Harris
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Connect / New Comment

I've thought about moving to DC, this article was a great way to see what it's really like to work in politics as a woman. It's still something I'm interested in, but it's good to have some insight into what it's like for women who are there now.
Olivia McCoy Follow Comment Author
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Alice Lai FOLLOW MEMBER
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I know that the key to being confident in yourself is believing in yourself but it's easier said than done. How can I achieve this?
Hi Alice, I think this is something all of us struggle with--even the most confident among us. It doesn't take much to have a bad day. And a bad day can really derail your confidence and self esteem. For me, I start by remembering who I am, and my purpose....and not confusing it with who I think I'm supposed to be....and I also try to remember that even when I might not feel particularly lovable, I am, in fact, loved....I refuse to allow myself to be defined by achievements or failings, by the size of my pocket book or any other superficial factor, because I know that all of those things are external to me, and easily taken away. And I just choose to believe....to know that I am capable....and have something to offer. Some days you have to act, you just have to pretend until you snap into your confident self....some days, it helps to remember all of the different things you achieved, especially when you weren't trying so hard or maybe felt less pressure....to remember that you've been there, done that, and that you can do it again....that you always land on your feet, even if initially it feels like you're falling on your face....and finally, I think it also helps to remember that even when you might feel a little alone, like you're the only person who has ever experienced a particular situation, that you're not alone; that there are thousands of women across time and history who've felt and experienced the same emotions, confusion, difficulties....there is a power that comes in realizing how connected we are, and understanding that the situations we face that blow or undermine our confidence have been experienced by others....so try also to focus on connectedness, connecting with yourself, but also a virtual connection with others. And give yourself a break every now and then....but don't stop trying. I hope you're having a wonderful summer, stay in touch!
Binta Brown FOLLOW MENTOR
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Candie Harris is Vice President of Marketing for Esselte North America, makers of the Pendaflex,...

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Monique Pope FOLLOW MEMBER
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Hello Tiffany i have a idea for a non profit organization but don't know how to start it
That's awesome! There are so many nonprofits out there. I encourage you to first find out if there's anything similar to what you're envisioning. If you really feel there's a unique need no one else is filling you might want to check out a nonprofit incubator. They are great at providing support to social innovators with new ideas. If you're in New York there are places like Beespace but there are incubators popping up all over the country. Best of luck and thanks for your leadership!

Articles / News

We're introducing an even better Levo.
Caroline Ghosn
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Articles / Job Search

It's all about the makeup, the lighting, and the tech.
Kelsey Manning
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Jeff Charbonneau is chemistry, physics and engineering teacher at Zillah High School in Zillah,...

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Enter to win this sweepstakes from COVERGIRL, Olay and Pantene for a must-have package of sk...
Rebecca Spencer
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leigha chan FOLLOW MEMBER
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What are some opportunities a young professional can take advantage outside of work to continue professional and personal development?
A ton! Early on in my career I volunteered for non-profit organizations and that grew to serving on a few nonprofit boards. I continue to do a ton of networking by attending as many events as possible. You can really expand your ecosystem that way. Of course any activity that you love for leisure can be turned into a leadership development activity. Reading, for example, or sports activities that build your grit. The world is your oyster!

Videos / Office Hours

As Vice President of Children's Programming at PBS, Linda Simensky collaborates with producers,...

Resources / Guides

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy? Knowing your passions and what energizes you, and using that knowle...