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Videos / Office Hours

Kathy Calvin is President and Chief Executive Officer of the United Nations Foundation. Her...

Connect / Q&A

Ella Toselli FOLLOW MEMBER
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What's the most important skill set to have for someone considering going into law?
A combination of the following: familiarity with the basic concepts in accounting and finance, general attention to detail, a willingness to work hard, and a client service orientation.

Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu walks you through the art of storytelling. You'll learn how to craft...

Articles / Lifestyle

These #LeanInTogether ideas will melt your heart.

Heather Finn
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Connect / New Comment

I might wear nice shorts. People in my office have in the past, so at least I wouldn't be the first. I prefer wearing skirts and dresses though - more comfortable to me, and more professional anyway.
Leigh Anne Zinsmeister Follow Comment Author
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Articles / Career Advice

From social work to investment banking, 28 Millennials across all industries reveal what ...

Zahra Barnes
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Articles / Lifestyle

Levo gives you the ultimate book gift guide, because everyone loves a good read over the hol...
Kelsey Manning
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Taylor Bartelt FOLLOW MEMBER
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How were you able to balance both a brand and school, and then continue that with the 80 other things college/life throws at you?
It was kind of crazy. I had to re-prioritize a lot of what I was doing and choose what was important to me. Classes, obviously, came first. I would make sure to get as much homework and projects done as possible over the weekend so that I could use my weeknights for meetings, group projects, and writing (for my blog). It's absolutely not impossible, but it wasn't necessarily easy. I decided to leave the rowing team after my junior year to focus my energies on other things such as blogging and getting my digital magazine off the ground. This allowed me to travel up to NYC almost every weekend for meetings with brands and whatnot. Leaving the team wasn't an easy choice, but ultimately I knew I had to devote time to the things that I needed to prioritize. (Disclaimer: there are times when college feels overwhelming, but it's absolutely preparing you for the things that you'll face in real life. Embrace the chaos and rest easy knowing that you're going to grow SO much as a result!)

Videos / Office Hours

Kristine Shine serves as the Chief Revenue Officer for Sugar Inc. Kristine leads the company's...

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Amanda Hesser is a co-founder of Food52.com and has been named one of the 50 most influential...

Articles / News

Hear the personal stories of some of today's most influential women, including Sarah Silverm...
Kathleen Harris
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Connect / New Comment

I would not wear shorts to the office, it seems inappropriate and too casual.
Victoria Hinojosa Follow Comment Author
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Connect / New Comment

Wearing shorts is pretty common among my colleagues, but it's been a non-starter for me. Don't get me wrong - I'm lucky enough that my work uniform is a t-shirt and a nice pair of jeans - but I like the flexibility of being able to have a blazer in the office to throw over my t-shirt if need be and not feel completely unprofessional. My verdict: shorts and blazers don't work unless you're a guitarist for AC/DC.
Nick Lioudis Follow Comment Author
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Resources / Guides

Entrepreneur and networking pro Kevin Conroy Smith walks you through the power of people and how to make meaningful connections with peop...

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Cornelia Guest has been passionate about animals and nature since she was a child. Her passion is...

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Levo League FOLLOW MEMBER
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Constructive feedback can be tough to absorb. What is your best advice for hearing hard feedback and making changes? Any personal examples?
So, you've graduated....had a nice month off and you're starting your first new job. First, congratulations.....Second, take some deep breaths. One of the things we forget is that we've spent our entire lives in school....so, for most of us, by the time we've graduated, we've become very good at school....which makes sense since by the time we graduate we've for sure had Malcolm Gladwell's 10,000 hours to become expert students.....but work is something all together different. Even if you've had great internships, it isn't quite the same thing as working. So the most important thing is to realize how much you don't know....again, this is hard, you've spent all that time in school learning....presumably that means you know a lot....but you haven't spent time working and it is going to be really different than being in school (unless you're first job is as an academic researcher or even research analyst)....ask questions, be a sponge, listen a lot....don't be afraid of asking dumb questions, because if you don't ask those questions, I assure you, you will make a dumb mistake....so better to ask the question you think might be a little silly. When you make a mistake, learn from them quickly...and try not to repeat the same mistake twice. There are, after all two kinds of mistakes. Mistakes of ignorance, which can't be helped (the first time) and mistakes of negligence. You never want to make a mistake of negligence, because that means you aren't paying attention and that will raise eyebrows in a not good way....but you have to forgive yourself for making mistakes when there was just no way you could possibly know....so long as you never make the same mistake again.....depending on your job, and your income, make sure you've automated everything you can....because you don't want to have to worry about spending all of your leisure time cleaning and/or paying bills. Also, set a budget right away, know what you can spend money on, and what you cannot....and stick to it....part of that budget, I hope, will include some money for a favorite cause or charity, it is never too early to become philanthropic....going back to the hard core career stuff....find some mentors in the workplace: men and women whom you trust, who love doing what they do and who are taking an interest in you....don't be afraid to be mentored by peers or even people reporting to you....but find mentors who are experienced as well, who can show you the ropes....finally, remember that you're not alone....talk to your friends, let them know how it is going and help one another out....one more finally, give it your absolute best shot, give it all you've got....you won't be sorry, promise!

Videos / Office Hours

Candie Harris is Vice President of Marketing for Esselte North America, makers of the Pendaflex,...

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Elana Gross FOLLOW MEMBER
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I have also worked in politics. What is your advice on whether or not to put it on your resume if it is all from one political party?
You should absolutely include your political experience on your resumé! Regardless of what side of the aisle you represent, most hiring professionals will recognize the hard work, persistence and critical thinking skills that a political experience provides. If you are especially sensitive, I recommend simply including the governing body that employed you. For example, US Senate or Governor's Office of California rather than stating the member's name. But, I strongly suggest standing behind your experience. Passion and pride are two qualities I look for in a candidate.

Resources / Guides

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy? Knowing your passions and what energizes you, and using that knowle...

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Lourdes Diaz FOLLOW MEMBER
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I recently graduated with a degree in Global Affairs(human rights). What skills are necessary for a career in global philanthropy?
Hi Lourdes, If you're interested in pursuing a corporate philanthropy career, it's important to have a strong understanding of business strategy and culture, along with non-profit, stewardship, fundraising and volunteerism basics and trends. In terms of skills, they're the same you'd need to succeed in any career - ability to make strong business cases, influencing without authority, ability to work in a matrixed environment, relationship management, persuasive communications - written and oral. Wishing you much success! Daisy

Connect / New Comment

Shorts are not professional enough for my office. Dresses of the same length are not as casual so they're fine, but shorts present a different image.
Be Hale Follow Comment Author
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Jessica Munoz FOLLOW MEMBER
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I'm a mid-level manager in a new department. How can I avoid their gossip/taking sides without losing trust/relationships?
This is a delicate line to walk, Tiffany, but I think it's always best to remain above the fray. I encourage you to only engage in these conversations when you can play the role of the coach in supporting your colleagues in managing certain situations/people. One way is to spark them to question their assumptions. For example with questions like "Was this a one time thing or has this been your consistent experience with X?" Another is to offer another rational alternative to the narrative the person has created. For example saying something like "Well it sounds crazy but if I put myself in X shoes I could see how they might think that X." The tricky balance is in genuinely helping your colleagues without expressing anything negative about who they might be struggling with.

Connect / New Comment

I work in a conservative environment, so the idea of wearing shorts or even a short skirt is out the window. I think shorts that are a bit longer in length, like Bermuda shorts, with a professional top might be appropriate in some creative workspaces. But in general, I feel that shorts are not professional for most offices. I agree with Be Hale that, unfortunately, they present a different image.
Lindita Bajrami Follow Comment Author
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Videos / Office Hours

Porter Gale is the author of Your Network Is Your Net Worth, is an internationally known speaker,...