Your amazing online presence is right this way.

Create your profile
Capture who you are, what you do, and where you're going. All in one place.

A bold, passionate career awaits you


Get instant access to a talented network and personalized tools that will help you get on the path you want - and make an impact.

Let's get started

HELP US PERSONALIZE LEVO FOR YOU

Do you know what your dream job is?

Or, skip this step →

YOU DO A LOT. WE KNOW.

Which best describes your current job status?

Or, skip this step →

GREAT, NOW LET'S TACKLE SOME BASICS

How long have you been in your career?

Or, skip this step →

LET'S TALK ABOUT HAPPINESS

How happy are you in your current role?

Or, skip this step →

FIND JOBS AND EVENTS NEAR YOU

Where do you want to work?

Woops. You left this field empty.

Or, skip this step →

Your Levo is ready!

Join to see personalized guides, mentors, networks, jobs, and more.


or

Videos / Office Hours

Kathy Savitt is the founder and former Chief Executive Officer of Lockerz and current Chief...

Connect / Q&A

Levo League FOLLOW MEMBER
plus
Constructive feedback can be tough to absorb. What is your best advice for hearing hard feedback and making changes? Any personal examples?
Great question! First, I think it is important to truly listen to the feedback with an open mind. Don't start putting together your "defense" as you are listening. Listen purely. Secondly, it is important to ask for specifics and multiple data points. Constructive feedback should be based on factual data! Then, it is really important that you absorb the information, and try to be objective. You may not agree with everything, but my experience is that there are usually consistencies throughout your career, even as you evolve. My personal example: When I was a Director of Marketing, I loved presenting to the President of our network. I noticed he always had a puzzled look on his face as I spoke. My boss told me that I was not being successful with him, and had no credibility! This was devastating! He told me to switch from "presentation mode" to "sales mode". This feedback was pivotal. I shifted my style, which came easily to me, and the President began to listen to me and to value me. He promoted me several times. He ultimately became a long term mentor, and remains so to this day! Key Watchout: Don't let myths become your reality! Sometimes, people create "myths" about you that may not be true based on one encounter. I have seen this happen to a number of people. Ensure there are multiple data points and some degree of consistency. Sometimes constructive feedback isn't very constructive!
Wonya Lucas FOLLOW MENTOR
plus

Resources / Guides

With Natalie MacNeil, Emmy Award-winning media entrepreneur and Founder of She Takes on the World

You perfectly polished your resume, nai...

Connect / Q&A

Levo League FOLLOW MEMBER
plus
What is your career wisdom for young professional women?
I would advise women to take risks earlier in their careers. There is definitely a balance between risk and reward. The roles that push you out of your comfort zones are the ones in which you learn a great deal and really empower yourself. So figure out what your passions or strengths are early on, and take on that role that really excites you, even if it scares you as well!

Connect / Q&A

You must have an idea of what works and what doesn't for planning programs.How do you balance between tried and true methods and new ideas?
When things work it is magic, but hiccups are inevitable: There is no formula. I wish there was a way to bottle a blockbuster program and break it out year after year. That would be too easy. Don’t get too comfortable: Tried and true eventually goes stale. It is important to develop a process so that you aren't reinventing the wheel every time you get out there, but then you must always build on that process and raise the bar each time. The balance is a mixed bag of freshening up old ideas and imagining new ideas. Link events are a factory of ideas, ever hungry for new voices and new thinking. Don’t be afraid of failure: While I am inherently an optimist, fear of failure comes creeping in going into an event. What if people cancel? What if someone pulls the fire alarm just as an event is starting and the entire audience need to be evacuated? What if the power goes out midday and a generator is required? What if a snowstorm cripples the city? What if the simultaneous translation mysteriously goes down just as your headline speaker takes the podium? It has all happened! The conference business is news meet theater. As they say in theater, “It’s on with the show!” There are the failures you can’t control, and then there are the moments when you wanted to try something new and it didn't quite work. Just because it fell flat, doesn't mean it isn't something you can’t rework, reinvent and revisit. The seed of inspiration may crash land the first time, but the second time it might take flight. If the concept still does not emerge a winner, move on, with grace. Feed your curiosity: Brainstorm with everyone you know, go to all types of events, read as much as you can, get out there and meet people. You never know where inspiration might come from, from tweens to Queens and everyone in between they are using technology, influencing market and reshaping the world. If you are excited by what is happening in the world that translates in your work.

Resources / Guides

With Gabrielle Bernstein, life coach and author

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy...

Connect / Q&A

As a college freshman, I've realized that deciding on a career is going to be tough. I feel so lost. How can I discover what's right for me?
First... relax! You have plenty of time to figure that out! I recommend making an educated guess at what you might be interested in and then find internships for the summer and even for during the semester. Sometimes finding out what you DON'T like to do is just as important as figuring out what you DO! But again, do not panic. You might take a class during your second semester of your senior year and realize that you have a completely ridiculous passion for something that you didn't have before. Or, you could graduate and still be on the hunt... everyone's path is different, but as long as you're learning along the way you're fine.

Connect / Q&A

Jamila White FOLLOW MEMBER
plus
I want to work at a big agency in the future, but I would like to know what is the best way to get my foot in the door?
jamila... the best way to get in the door is to intern at the big agencies over the summer! if you don't get the internship you want, working hard and making strong relationships at a smaller pr firm is still a great resume-builder, and can work toward achieving a big-agency internship the following summer. if you end up starting out at a small agency-- not to fear! my colleagues and i love hiring folks from the smaller shops, as they often have deeper experience working with senior management and interacting closely with clients.

Connect / Q&A

Hi Nicholas! What are the best techniques in transitioning to a new career?
Hi Ecclesia, Think about this question from a future employer's point of view: What is going to be the first question on their mind? Probably something like this: "So you have experience in X, and you are coming to me to interview for a job in Y. How will your skills and experience from X translate into Y, and why are you making the transition? How can I be sure you'll be successful in Y?" Hence, I'd build a plan that allows you to have a confident and relevant answer to this question. In my personal experience, I think a good example is from when I was working in consulting, and I wanted to transition from working on banking/ finance projects to projects in agriculture in developing economies. I was working with Caroline (Levo's fantastic CEO and fearless leader) at the time, and she actually gave me some great advice: Reach out to the folks at the firm who are experts in agriculture, and ask them for materials that could help you to build a background in the sector. That way, when an opportunity arises, you can demonstrate that you have been preparing thoroughly for the work, and that you are dedicated to making the transition a success. That was step 1 for me - building my internal credentials. At the same time, I looked for ways to build my external credentials. I had a thesis floating in my head around knowledge transfer and economic development in sub-Saharan Africa from my college days, and I chose to put pen to paper and turn that thesis into an article, which was eventually published in a university journal. This gave me a tangible asset that demonstrated my passion for economic development, particularly in the region of the world where I was hoping to work. I could have done a better job of promoting my thought leadership on social media - that's a tool that I still under-utilize, and it's a great way to build visibility around your interests in a new field. With these two factors - internal and external credentials, I was able to pitch my case to new agriculture projects. I didn't get the first one that I applied for, but I did get the second one, and it was a transformative professional experience. So don't give up! I wish you the best of luck. Cheers, Nicholas

Videos / Office Hours

Caroline Ghosn is Co-founder and CEO of Levo League, a thriving community of young professionals,...

Resources / Guides

With Tiffany Dufu, motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer

Tiffany teaches you the difference between management and ...

Videos / Office Hours

Majora Carter is an urban revitalization strategy consultant, real estate developer, and Peabody...

Resources / Guides

With Joan Kuhl, author, and founder & president of Why Millennials Matter

Oftentimes young managers, while enthusiastic, ambitious, an...

Resources / Guides

With Bill McGowan, speaking coach and author

Public speaking and communicating at work can be a challenge for everyone—whether you'...

Videos / Office Hours

Laura Gentile is vice president of espnW, ESPN’s first dedicated business built to serve, inform...

Connect New Comment

I didn't really sit down and get serious about paying off my student loan debt until after I finished my grad degree. After taking a back seat on my own finances for so long, it took watching almost $3,000 in capitalized interest added to my mountain of debt. It's taken an entire year to get my grad school loans back to where they were a year ago, plus I still have my undergrad loans to worry about. I've found that paying off the smallest loans first had the same effect on me that you mentioned - motivation. I've also began treating my loans like a mortgage and paying significantly more than the monthly payment. In the last year alone I paid almost $7,000 in interest, which seems like a lot, but in the long run it's going to save me a lot of money. I also track my total after every payment, and watching my principal decreasing gives me an extra reason to smile every month.
Lindsay Sperling Follow Comment Author
plus

Connect New Comment

I love that this topic is being addressed! And I'd love for more in-depth coverage of it. While it's a great overview (and that has its value as well, providing a big picture view), for example, the $50,000 production assistant blurb raises a lot of questions for me -- as an entertainment industry freelancer myself, I'm a mid-level manager who is in the $30k range with a relatively pared-down but still safely comfy living in NYC. (And not saying that as judgment -- I'm fortunate to not have debt, medical expenses, etc.. But it emphasizes to me how the devil is in the details and how non-representative samples can be.) Thanks for doing this piece, and I'd love to read more about the working world for those of us not necessarily in the corporate world and/or with $80k salaries.
Alyssa Howard Follow Comment Author
plus

Resources / Guides

With Natalie MacNeil, Emmy Award-winning media entrepreneur and Founder of She Takes on the World

You work a 9-to-5 day and then do a 5-to...

Articles / Career Advice

It will make the whole transition a lot smoother.

Heather Finn
FOLLOW AUTHOR
plus

Articles / Lifestyle

Make that beginning-of-the-year buzz last forever.

Madison Feller
FOLLOW AUTHOR
plus

Videos / Office Hours

Deborah Gillis is President & Chief Executive Officer of Catalyst, the leading nonprofit...

Videos / Office Hours

Stephanie Ruhle is an anchor and managing editor for Bloomberg Television and editor-at-large for...