Articles / Work-Life Balance

Here's what you need to know about going back to work after maternity leave.
Kathleen Harris
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Kathleen brings a rich background in award-winning, highly effective client advertising, with a...

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How do you deal when this "mean girl" is contanstly making verbal attacks about personal things. For example, today in the ladies room im conversing with another coworker and she just jumps into the conversation and says "Your gaining weight." Mind you I've been losing weight. This person, I really cant call her a woman because of the way she acts and carries herself which i feel is incredibly unlady like; has been attacking me constantly since day 1. Also, shes a supervisor. Se escorted me to my initial interview and was very friendly but once i was hired turned into a complete bitch towards me(sorry for the language) almost like she was upset i got hired. Side note: she is also incredibly close with the HR Supervisor. People stay away from her in the office because she is a walking stereotype and has no tact. I also keep my distance but she will seek me out to make some kind of comment and mispronounce my name repeatedly. Any advice?
Fabiana Holley Follow Comment Author
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Serria Thomas FOLLOW MEMBER
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How do I get noticed moving to a big city from the midwest? I have the skills and experience! Advice on standing out in a place like NYC?
I always find that not taking the same old approach as everyone else is what's going to make a difference. Don't go the boring old cover letter + resume approach, sent into the abyss of an apply online site. Think about ways that you can communicate who YOU are while still being professional, of course. Whether it's a quirky email or message on LinkedIn, an invitation to buy a recruiter coffee at a NYC staple spot, or something else that is unique - go for it. You have nothing to lose. Also, another tip, don't make your relocation a huge part of the conversation. Try using a tri-state address (friends or family) and if they ask if you're able to come in for an interview, make it work. It should be as easy for them to meet you as it is to meet a candidate who lives 10 blocks away. Good luck!

Resources / Guides

Entrepreneur and networking pro Kevin Conroy Smith walks you through the power of people and how to make meaningful connections with peop...

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This seems like a very valuable tool! I'd love to try it out.
Sarah Bonnar Follow Comment Author
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Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu walks you through the art of storytelling. You'll learn how to craft...

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Grace Hoy FOLLOW MEMBER
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How can recent graduates maintain confidence when expressing ideas/opinions in the workplace? How did you do this at McKinsey?
I love this question, because building confidence was a multi-year process for me that started in college and continued into the first 2-3 years of my professional life. In this case I refer specifically to teaching myself to stop undermining my own perspectives (with fillers such as "like" or "maybe", or by putting forth my thoughts in the form of a question), and learning to trust my inner compass. At McKinsey, you are encouraged to uphold what is called "an obligation to dissent," which means that if you don't feel that something that your team is doing aligns with the optimal outcome, it is your obligation to speak up and set up a counter-case with facts and evidence. That phrase stuck with me and helped me understand that an opinion, no matter how 'lowly' (as I thought of myself) was critical to a well-rounded team. In terms of practically building and maintaining confidence, I highly suggest pairing with a peer mentor and practicing your assertion skills. It might sound silly but learn how to modulate your language and statements in their presence, and ask them for open and honest feedback. You can't be what you can't see, and practice makes comfort, so work on confident delivery and professional gravitas just like you would work on any "hard skill". If you want to really kick it up a notch, you can do a DIY media training session at home, which basically boils down to filming yourself responding to questions or presenting something you are practicing for work. You will be STUNNED by the things you might do that undermine your delivery or confidence (for example, I learned that I touch my hair or look down when I'm not sure about an answer), and you will learn to stop doing them. Finally, as Sheryl Sandberg said in her office hours with us yesterday (which I highly recommend with respect to this question, if you haven't seen them already), "Pretend to have self confidence that you don't yet feel." Eventually, you will grow into the person you aspire to be.

Connect / Q&A

How do get a Public Relations job in city that doesn't seem to be offering those jobs? I have done relevant internships but had no luck.
it depends on what sector you're interested in covering. if you're not finding anyghing on the agency side, contact principals at local non profits, political campaigns, small brands, basically anywhere for "in house" positions. there is no city that is entirely devoid of PR opportunities.

Videos / Office Hours

As Vice President of Children's Programming at PBS, Linda Simensky collaborates with producers,...

Videos / Office Hours

Paulette Brown is a Partner and Chief Diversity Officer of Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP and is a...

Articles / Job Search

It's all about the makeup, the lighting, and the tech.
Kelsey Manning
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Videos / Office Hours

Award winning producer/actor Kevin Spacey has been the Artistic Director of The Old Vic Theatre...

Articles / News

We're introducing an even better Levo.
Caroline Ghosn
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Resources / Guides

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy? Knowing your passions and what energizes you, and using that knowle...

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This sounds like a PERFECT way to jump start your own "personal brand". I'd love to take the test!
Zuri Rose Baron Follow Comment Author
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Melanie Ling FOLLOW MEMBER
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What are your thoughts on the future of social media and what is the next era for Facebook?
So I think we're at the very beginning for Facebook and Social Media because it turns out there's enormous power to communicating who we really are with the people we know and you know I've no doubt that if I haven't joined Facebook, I never would have written this book because I never would have been comfortable sharing who I am. and you know sometimes it still is a little uncomfortable for me. I know it is for others but what social media gives us is the power to do things like what the LEVO League is doing. It gives us the power to launch something where you can ask a mentor a question and you can do it not just online with that person but you can share those responses with everyone else and think about that. you can ask the question and you said in your video, we encourage you to make it public. Why make it public? Certainly because it's good for other people. But it's also good for you, because what's going to happen if you make that answer public is someone else is going to jump onto that thread and give you more information and an idea you hadn't thought of. And so, I think we're better when we share our real selves, I think we're better when we're really authentic and I think we're better when we all work together and in social media, which I think is a huge part of what enables something incredible like the LEVO League and all of us to grow. So I think we're at the beginning I'm super excited to see where Facebook takes us and where all of the other social media platforms take us as well.

Videos / Office Hours

Cornelia Guest has been passionate about animals and nature since she was a child. Her passion is...

Articles / Career Advice

Everything you need to master your personal brand.
Amy Feezor
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Maxie McCoy FOLLOW MEMBER
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As success rises, like-ability declines for women. How have you learned not to internalize objections & to care less about what they think?
One thing I came to see over my career is that no matter how hard you try, at least 15 percent of people aren't going to like you period. And when someone doesn't like you, you may never know why. It may simply be that on some level you remind that person of her sister, the one that chopped off her Barbie's hair with nail clippers. So use that stat to help you get beyond the need to please. Instead of trying to make people like you, focus on helping them like what they do--by giving them clear guidance and big, achievable goals, supporting their efforts, listening, criticizing them constructively, not coddling them, and praising their strong achievements. Those people will respect you and ideally give you their best--and that's what you should be aiming for as a leader.
Kate White FOLLOW MENTOR
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When does the book come out? Would love to try test. Thanks!
Michelle Finelli Follow Comment Author
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Videos / Office Hours

Jim Gilliam is the founder and CEO of NationBuilder, the world’s first Community Organizing...

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Melissa Stanger FOLLOW MEMBER
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How do you build a voice for women w/o alienating other genders? How do you ensure the voice is specific, yet resonates with everyone?
Hi Melissa, Great question and thanks for answering. The even broader question is how do you advocate for any single group without alienating others. I believe that when you can impactfully share how the benefits gained from supporting a particular group benefits all, then you help neutralize the me vs them element. When teaching about the impact and importance of women in the predominantly male golf industry I use the consumer segment called the purple people. Without gender or race they represent a group of beneficial qualities that make them a great consumer group to target. When the guys understand and buy in and subsequently find out the qualities they value are women's qualities, their approach is more open and engaged..... win... win. Happy to discuss further with you.

Articles / College

Listen up parents: Here's how to talk to your new graduates.
Kelsey Manning
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