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Videos / Office Hours

Dee Poku is the co-founder and CEO of the WIE Network, an innovative global conference and...

Connect / Q&A

Marissa Brock FOLLOW MEMBER
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How do you drive results/culture change when diversity and inclusion is more talk than action or support in your organization?
Marissa, Driving change in the diversity space often requires organizations and individuals to rethink the way that they do business, think about each other and treat each other.  This is no small feat.  The journey  - and yes, it is a journey - requires a whole lot of talk, positioning and repositioning of ideas, concepts and business strategies, taking one step forward and two steps back, all the while with a clear sense of direction and the impact you wish to make.  If it looks like you're not making the progress you seek, search out those, however few they may be, who support your vision.  Partner with them to conduct a discovery exercise of what's worked and what hasn't.  Dissect your message, tactics, timing, alignment with cultural and organizational values, and shape or reshape a strategy focused on making progressive, small wins that are owned and led not just by you but by those supporters and champions of this important work.  When you're surrounded and supported by others who share your vision, you'll be surprised by how much bolder and targeted your strategy can be.  I wish you much success!

Resources / Guides

Are you having trouble envisioning a career that would make you truly happy? Knowing your passions and what energizes you, and using that knowle...

Articles / Career Advice

Her mission: to let disabled women of color know they’re not alone.

Heather Finn
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Resources / Guides

Public speaking and communicating at work can be a challenge for everyone—whether you're presenting to a large group, sharing an idea in a meeti...

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Christina oversees Quantcast’s global marketing strategy and operations, including demand...

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Yep, definitely a helpful article with lots of truth in it. I've had a similar case like "The Inconsiderate" one. Almost every morning on my way to school I have to listen to people talking on the phone(srsly, tell me your magic spell for this kind of energy so early in the morning) and sometimes it irritates me so bad I want to flee from the subway. That's when I "feel compelled to speak up" and surprisingly, people listen to me.
Симона Гоцова Follow Comment Author
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Articles / Career Advice

Six Millennials share how they bring in extra cash.

Tiffany Teng
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Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu walks you through the art of storytelling. You'll learn how to craft...

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Kelsey Cruz FOLLOW MEMBER
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The freelancing game has changed! How do I get prospective employers to read my work and hire me when everyone seems to be writing for free?
This sounds kind of crazy but I'd suggest that you come up with great, compelling titles for your pieces. Prospective employers only skim, if that, so you have about two seconds to hook them. If you snag their eye with a great title, they will be impressed with THAT skill of yours and they will more than likely keep reading. I just re-read a piece that was in Vanity Fair a year or two ago called, "The Case of the Vanishing Blonde." What a title, right? That is a title that COMPELS you to keep reading. I bet people missed their train stops because of that title. The piece was damn good but think about how many fewer people would have looked at it if it was called "The Story of a Private Eye."
Kate White FOLLOW MENTOR
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Videos / Office Hours

With nearly two decades of experience in digital, print, broadcast radio and broadcast...

Videos / Office Hours

Marissa Kraxberger is the Vice President of Creative at Oscar de la Renta, where she has been the...

Resources / Guides

Motivational leader and Levo's Chief Leadership Officer Tiffany Dufu teaches you the difference between management and leadership. Y...

Connect / Q&A

Robin Sparks FOLLOW MEMBER
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What is the one thing you would advise any would-be female entrepreneur to do before launching her own business?
Get comfortable with being uncomfortable. Starting and growing your own business is hard: you have to be willing not only to do the work but to push yourself to think bigger and bolder than perhaps you've ever done before, be clear-eyed and realistic about whether you're actually starting something new and innovative that solves a big problem or instead, looking to develop a lifestyle business. If the latter - and again, I urge you to think big, bold and audacious - both to start and grow, you'll need to do things that for many women are uncomfortable: ask for help, give up some control, "sell" the vision/business model as well as yourself as the awesome founder and probably most importantly, let go of "perfect." Just recognize that if you keep trying to get everything "just right" before you launch/grow/pivot, you'll never move forward. So go in the direction of uncomfortable - it's where all the great stuff happens.

Connect / New Comment

Startup by Gimlet Media is great for small business owners, especially season 2 which follows a tech startup run by some awesome women. Also, Note to Self with Manoush Zomorodi, and Mystery Show with Starlee Kine. Both amazing podcast hosts!
Elma Valerio Follow Comment Author
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Levo League FOLLOW MEMBER
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Constructive feedback can be tough to absorb. What is your best advice for hearing hard feedback and making changes? Any personal examples?
Good question. The key here is to recognise and accept that you can learn from all kinds of feedback and use this to help you grow as an individual in the work place. This is why it's really important to actively seek feedback from people you trust. Having a mentor and sponsor who can honestly give you advice is great and it gets you comfortable with managing any negative feedback. Always aim to take a positive out of feedback, if you're told something negative think to yourself- ok - that wasn't my best effort so I'm going to make sure I don't slip up in that way again. I'm constantly learning and trying to improve. It's been suggested to me by my mentor that I should try and show more patience.... This is tough as I'm always keen to get things moving and achieve success. However because I trust the person giving me this advice I think to myself ok, I'm going to try and be more patient, to slow it down a bit and work to bring others with me on a specific task. I know that's the right thing to do. Self reflection is also really important. 9 times out of 10 you're going to be told something you already know.... I'd suggest you should start asking for feedback at every opportunity. Then each day try to build on the advice.
Jane Gotts FOLLOW MENTOR
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Elana Gross FOLLOW MEMBER
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What advice do you have for focusing on your own professional development and success without comparing yourself to others?
Elana, I have a belief that the resources you need are always there if you can only see them. As I was fretting about how to reply to your question, I received a newsletter from leadership coach Ann Mehl that summed up beautifully what I was thinking but having a hard time putting into words: "As human beings, we are biologically programmed to look over at the guy in the next lane. Yet nothing causes as much misery as this tendency to compare ourselves unfavorably with others. It's hard to swim in a straight line when you're focused on what the other guy (or girl) is doing. You know the one who is swimming faster, more gracefully and easily than you are? Self-comparison is no-win game, and the shortest road to hell. The trick then is to gently and carefully, bring the focus back to your own stroke. Recognize that everybody has their own unique set of skills, as well as challenges. The goal is to embrace your journey, your potential. Are you learning? Are you growing? That is all that matters." So thanks, Ann, and best of luck to you Elana, as you swim your best in your own special lane of life. Good luck!

Connect / New Comment

I've had the exact same feelings for the last couple of weeks. I spent nine years at my alma mater, and constantly worry that the contributions and friendships that I made there will merely fade. The statuses, pictures, and tweets make my heart twinge just a little. "To thee our hearts belong" is the closing line of our alma mater, and as the current class begins their collegiate journey, I smile and wish happiness for them. Part of me wants to go back and get yet another degree under my belt, but I know I have to let go at some point-- this is why homecoming was invented!
Christina Campbell Follow Comment Author
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Articles / News

“Awesomesauce,” “hangry,” and others are finally official words!<...

Jenny Groza
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Articles / Career Advice

The “Fashion Queen” co-host on owning your dreams and more.

Amy Elisa Jackson
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paige FOLLOW MEMBER
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I work in corporate NYC, and am comfortable. It isn't my passion, but it is safe. How can I break through this? Healthy living is my passion
Hi Paige! Great to hear from you. I was in your shoes ages ago...I can definitely sympathize! I did a good bit of research and inner soul searching in terms of what I might want to do within the healthy living space. Research different jobs/areas that are of interest to you, or might be, and then talk/grab coffee with as many people as you can within that area! Alumni networks are great, or even cold-call emails. Good people will take a few moments to chat if you're sincere and motivated. Most importantly, I took a calculated risk. I went to back to graduate school and worked on some side projects that were in the field I was excited about - meanwhile I kept a corporate job for a few years to pay the bills and keep me stable. I was able to build and grow my passions over time at a pace that worked for me. Best of luck with everything! Marissa

Resources / Guides

Entrepreneur and networking pro Kevin Conroy Smith walks you through the power of people and how to make meaningful connections with peop...