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Goldie Blox: New Toy Is Building Block to Getting Girls Interested in Math & Science

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Whenever I spend time with my energetic 6-year-old cousin Sarah, I am in princess overload. Everything is pink and purple. Everything. When she grows up, she wants to be a—you guessed it—princess. I did not fully understand where her princess obsession stemmed from until we looked through the holiday toy store catalogs together so she could show me what she wanted for Christmas. The majority of the girl toys revolved around Disney princesses, Barbies and pink dress-up clothes, while the pages for boys featured building sets, trains, games, chemistry sets and characters like Bob the Builder. When I pointed out an awesome Lego set, she pointed to the little boy on the page and responded in disgust that it was not for girls.

Why are most of the toys that inspire kids to build, think and explore mostly marketed to boys?

Young girls like my cousin need toys that inspire them to be more than pretty princesses. (Likewise, boys need toys that inspire them to test out traditionally female fields.) We desperately need more females in engineering and technology, two of the fastest growing fields today. Currently, only 13 percent of engineers are women. The number of women leading tech startups is even lower—below 10 percent.

Thankfully, Debbie Sterling, founder of Goldie Blox, has created a toy specifically designed for young girls that encourages them to pursue engineering. Sterling thoroughly researched children’s play patterns and gender differences to develop a toy that will build girls’ self-confidence in spatial skills. She created a series of interactive books and construction toys that feature Goldie, an adventurous girl who loves math and science. While Goldie explores with her friends, she encounters problems that need to be solved by building simple machines. Throughout the story, the girls get to build along with Goldie.

Goldie is an amazing role model for young girls that promotes problem-solving and curiosity. It is beyond exciting to see a toy that combats gender stereotypes and sparks young girls’ interest in math and science. We already have enough young aspiring princesses; we need more aspiring engineers, techies and entrepreneurs.

Goldie Blox is more than just a toy, it is a much-needed movement to encourage future generations of girls to help build our cities, products and technology.

What do you think of Goldie Blox? Tell us in the comments!

Topics:

#Holiday #Gender Stereotypes Lifestyle News
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Carly Heitlinger
Carly Heitlinger

This is definitely a step in the right direction. Legos were definitely one of my most favorite toys growing up– alongside my American Girl doll!!!

A toy, though, can only do so much. Good communication, positive modeling, and in-class education is really what will drive more and more girls into STEM careers.

MSrbinovich
MSrbinovich

I read about this about a month ago! Would love to see more toys like this targeted for girls. That being said, parents need to encourage their daughters as well. We were one of the first families I knew to have a computer at home, my parents bought me legos & chemistry sets, and I had an early gaming console for kids called Socrates (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lb5Im7lwc6g) that I loved - along with dolls and more traditional "girl" toys. My dad also made me watch StarTrek with him on the regular & let me experiment w/ building things using his tools in the garage. :) That exposure definitely had an influence on me and shaped my interest in tech growing up. The bigger counter-influence was the peer pressure that came along with junior high.

kimberrleigh
kimberrleigh

I currently work in IT, and I love seeing this stuff in the market for young girls! Growing up, we always had a computer (my mom worked in Medical Transcription). i remember begging my parents to let us keep the family computer in my room so I could play and learn on it. I guess after a certain point, they realized I would do something with my life with technology.
There was a certain point in middle school when I realized I loved computers so much, I wasn't going to let boys intimidate me to stop using them. We need to be empowering young women to rise above social stigmas and pursue what they love!

Mike Reid
Mike Reid

The idea then is to keep on with the pink and purple theme but add a bit of science. No thought of convincing advertisers to alter their approach?
Worried!


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