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3 Things You *Must* Do When Applying for a New Job

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Switching jobs frequently is becoming much more commonplace (in its 2014 survey, the Bureau of Labor Statistics found the average job tenure to be only 4.6 years) and far less stigmatized. Job hoppers have been said to have a higher learning curve, perform better, be more loyal, and even get paid more. That’s kind of exciting, isn’t it?

If you’ve stopped feeling fulfilled by your current gig or you just want to try something new, you’re clearly not alone. What matters, though, is how you handle the switch. “There are tons of reasons for wanting to leave your job,” says Adam Smiley Poswolsky, a career expert and author of The Quarter-Life Breakthrough, a guidebook to help Millennials find meaningful work. “The most important thing to do when you’re in this situation is be absolutely sure you want to quit, and if you are, you need to be as respectful of your current employer as possible [during the process].” Read: The key to successfully applying for a new job is tact.

So, once you’re done updating your resume and sifting through job boards, add these three must-do items to your job search checklist:

[Related: Ask Erica: “How Do I Explain Why I’m Leaving My Current Job in an Interview?”]

1. Give your current job an honest evaluation.

Before you get any further in the job application process, Poslowsky says to take a minute to really think about why you want to leave your current gig and what you have (or haven’t!) learned from it. Doing so will not only help you decide if moving on from this job is really the best decision for you right now, but will also help you determine what you want and need from a future employer. “I see careers as a journey, and each job along the way is just a stop,” Poswolsky says. “You need to be sure you’ve gotten everything you can out of this stop and you’re ready for the next one.”

[Related: How to Know When It’s OK to Walk Away]

2. Create new contacts while still preserving old relationships.

An important part of any career transition is building and fostering the relationships you need to help make that transition successful. This is especially important if you’re hoping to switch jobs, switch industries, or take on a role unlike any you’ve ever worked in before. “Finding new mentors and connections is an important step [in the job search process],” Poswolsky says. “When you’re looking for a new job, you’re going to want to start attending meetups, networking events, and conferences to find people who can guide you in the right direction.” So, pull out your planner and schedule some informational interviews with new contacts, but, as Poswolsky notes, do your best to preserve relationships at your current company, as well—although it might be tempting to just let some of those connections fizzle out, you never know when they could help you out in the future.

[Related: Everything You Need to Know About Making a Career Change in Your 20s]

3. Tell your current employer when the time is right.

As nervous as you might be about telling your boss you want to say goodbye to your current position, there will come a time when you need to let her in on your plans. But, um, when is that, exactly? The answer really depends on when you feel most comfortable talking to your boss, but Poswolsky recommends waiting until you’ve actually received an offer that you plan on taking—and then still giving your boss enough time to take action. “We’ve all grown up hearing about giving your ‘two weeks notice,’” Poswolsky says. “But in reality, you should probably give your boss a minimum of four to six weeks.” Bonus points if you help out with the hiring and training process for your successor, which Poswolsky says is an important responsibility of any employee.

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Photo: Mint Images / Getty Images

Topics:

#Homepage #Job Hunt #New Job #Career Change Career Advice
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For all of you looking to make a career change, read this.

Excellent insights. Good to know.

Thank you for sharing this!

Love this article! Giving your current job an honest evaluation is extremely important when applying for a new job. It will not only help you find a job that's right for you, but it will help you learn more about your own personal interests!

Great article!

Very well written, and good info. A Missouri native!! :)

This is a great read! Thanks for the post!

Monisola Obateru
Monisola Obateru

Needful thanks

Extremely helpful! I appreciate the focus on making the process as positive as possible.

Thanks this article is awesome

Thanks for the helpful advise. Seems like I've been doing it right.

Really need to spread this word out to everyone, I see a lot of people not following this and getting into trouble.

Courteney Douglas
Courteney Douglas

Heather, I agree that self-evaluation is a critical part of the process when it comes to making sound decisions and achieving one's professional goals. It can help to have a professional in your corner. For resume and job hunting tips, I highly recommend visiting the ResumeSpice website: https://resumespice.com

I agree Owais.

Thanks for sharing.. Great read!

Yakobus Fearley Michael
Yakobus Fearley Michael

Thanks for this article.. Very helpful..

I think that's a good point about giving your boss more than two weeks notice for a new job. It's tricky balance of course, because if you give too much notice they'll try to replace you before you're ready to go, but if you don't give them enough notice you're putting them in a bind which is unprofessional.

I feel the best way to give notice is to casually mention you're searching for other opportunities, and then when the job offer comes in, try to negotiate the smoothest transition for you, the new employer and your old employer. That way you can keep your old contacts without burning bridges just in case you need to use someone as future reference.

As you said in the beginning of the article; most people don't stay at their jobs for long these days.

This article will be useful to my friend who is looking for a new job! Definitely will be sharing this with him!

Great reading this and give some thoughts.

This is some very good advice! I'm going to pass this along to my friend who is currently looking for a new job!

#3 is the hardest part! Definitely struggled with that when making my career change just over a year ago.

Great advice, I think the bit on honest evaluation could be expanded even further. Is not just about the job, in fact it's mostly NOT about the job at all, it's about YOU. What you value, what interests you, what are your natural skills and strengths, what kind of environment is good for you and essentially what is ultimate career you envision. You might not get the perfect job from the get go, but if you don't know where you're going, no road will ever take you there. So invest some serious work in the "pre-search" phase, to underline what it is that you're searching for.

This is good advice and especially useful for those about to start their careers. It's important to know this process as it will help you throughout your career changes.

Wow! Thanks this useful.

awesome i need same job

Love this. If you really sit and think about your current (or previous) positions you can better identify what you liked, didn't liked and how you've grown while there.


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