A few days ago Wired put out a list of the 101 “best reporters, writers, and thinkers on the internet.” But out of that large list, only a handful were women. As you can imagine, people were not thrilled with this selection. We managed to find an additional 11 women who were worthy of this list very easily.  So Wired here are some suggestions for your next list.

Susan Antilla (@antillaview), Financial Columnist

Susan Antilla is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a contributor for TheStreet.com. Antilla has been writing about finance for more than 30 years. She is author of Tales From the Boom-Boom Room: The Landmark Legal Battles That Exposed Wall Street’s Shocking Culture of Sexual Harassment. She recently wrote on CNN, “The public has this idea that the media world is run by bleeding-heart liberals more focused on homeless shelters than tax shelters. You know, progressive thinkers looking to change the world. Reality is it’s a business like most others, run largely by men who push back at serious threats to their authority.”

Anna Holmes (@annaholmes), Founder of Jezebel and freelance writer

Holmes founded the hugely popular women’s site Jezebel, which was born to better serve and speak to the female readers of Gawker. Since leaving the site in 2010, she has written for the New York Times, The Washington Post, Salon, The New Yorker and Entertainment Weekly among other publications on a variety of women’s issues. Her first book, Hell Hath No Fury: Women’s Letters From the End of the Affair was published in 2002 and her anticipated second book, The Book of Jezebel, comes out this October. This past spring she notably spoke out against critics of Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In when she suggested that “maybe you should read the book” in The New Yorker.

Bianca Bosker (@bbosker), Executive Tech Editor for The Huffington Post

The Princeton graduate covers technology in a unique and intriguing way.  Her writing has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Far Eastern Economic Review, Fast Company, Conde Nast Traveler, and The Oregonian, among other publications. She is the co-author of Bowled Over: A Roll Down Memory Lane. I suggest you read her enlightening and revealing piece on what really happens on a teenage girl’s iPhone.

Alyssa Rosenberg (@AlyssaRosenberg), Features Editor for ThinkProgress.org

Anyone who says writing about pop culture can’t be meaningful hasn’t read one of Rosenberg’s pieces (I was pretty sure she was going to convince them to keep the beloved “Bunheads” on the air). In addition to her role at ThinkProgress.org, she is a columnist for the XX Factor at Slate, and a correspondent for TheAtlantic.com. The Yale grad’s work has appeared inThe Atlantic, The Daily Beast, The New Republic, Esquire.com, The DailyThe American Prospect, and National Journal.

Vanessa Grigoriadis (@thevanessag), Fashion columnist

Vanessa Maia Grigoriadis is a contributing editor for Vanity Fair and writes for Rolling Stone and New York Magazine. In 2007 she received the National Magazine Award for profile writing. She has a stunning profile of fashion king André Leon Talley in the September issue of Vanity Fair.

Kara Swisher (@karaswisher), Technology columnist

Swisher is the founder and co-executive of All Things Digital. She also writes for The Wall Street Journal. She is one of the most authoritative voices on technology on the internet. She recently wrote in an open letter to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos on the state and power of internet journalism. “A lot of success in journalism is about what it has always been about, and that will never change, even if we beam our stories to readers via chips embedded in our eyeballs. The medium may be the message, to paraphrase Marshall McLuhan, but the message is also the medium, and the two are inexorably linked now,” she wrote.

Vanessa Valenti (@vanessavalenti), Co-founder of Feministing.com

As the co-founder of the feminist blog, Feministing.com, Valenti has been a very big part of building the largest online feminist community in the world (over 500,000 unique readers every month). She has won several awards including the Sidney Hillman Prize in Blog Journalism, the Blogger’s Choice Award for Best Political Blog and the Choice USA Award. She was named by Gloria Steinem as one of the young women that inspire her to believe the feminist movement continues. Not too shabby.

Marin Cogan (@marincogan), Political Reporter

Cogan is a political correspondent and has written for a number of esteemed publications including The New Republic, Glamour, ESPN the magazine and NYMag.com. She garnered some attention earlier this year when she criticized the writing on the hit show “House of Cards” for propagating the stereotype of the “reporter-seductress” that sleeps with her sources. “We have not ‘all done it’, as Skorsky claims. And yet, the reporter-seductress stereotype persists, in part because some men in Washington refuse to relinquish it,” she wrote.

Jenna Wortham (@jennydeluxe), Technology reporter

Wortham is a New York Times technology reporter and co-founder of the Tumblr zine Girl Crush. She has been covering internet startups, digital culture, and the tech scene in New York since 2008, with articles in both print and online. She updates her 496,558 Twitter followers consistently with all the inside scoop. For The Atlantic.com, she gave a fantastic inside look at her work process and really entire daily routine. She wrote, “In all, I’m probably on one screen or another, consuming some form of news — social or otherwise — from the moment I’m awake until the time I go to bed. But most of the time, it doesn’t feel like work to me, I genuinely get excited and inspired and motivated by the articles, GIFs, riffs on GIFS and other multitude of conversations that are happening on so many different levels and places around the Web.”

Mary McKenna, Science Journalist

McKenna is a science journalist who specializes in public health, global health, and food policy. She is a blogger for Wired, a columnist and contributing editor for Scientific American and writes frequently for national and international magazines and websites including Nature, Slate, SELF, TheAtlantic.com, The Guardian, and More Magazine. Discover Magazine’s Ed Yong said McKenna “is like a living arrow, fired straight into the heart of the ‘blogging isn’t journalism’ meme. On her blog Superbug, she regularly delivers some of the best journalism around on the subjects of infectious disease and agriculture.”

Margaret Wheeler Johnson (@mwjohnso), Lifestyle Editor at The Huffington Post

Johnson helped launch The Huffington Post’s Women’s section in June 2011 and has made it the tour de force of journalism that it is today. The Princeton grad’s work has appeared in Slate and The Financial Times as well. Her articles about her personal life are honest and thought provoking. Johnson’s recap of “Girls” episodes with fellow Huffington Post editors are also incredible.

Who else do you think should have been on this list? Tell us in the comments.

Ask Kate White, former editor of Cosmopolitan, about her career in journalism!